An action book recommendation: A Promise to Kill: A Clyde Barr Novel by Erik Storey

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CJEJno.
Last year his “Nothing Short of Dying” was widely hailed as the best debut novel in the mystery/crime/thriller genre and his second book released this week equals — some of us will say surpasses — his impressive first.
Book description from Google Books:
From the author dubbed by Jeffery Deaver “a born storyteller” whose first novel Nothing Short of Dying was hailed as “exceptional,” “a rollercoaster read,” and “adrenaline-fueled” by publications on both sides of the Atlantic, this is Erik Storey’s next entry in the Clyde Barr series, a locomotive-paced brawler that has its hero teaming with besieged members of a Native American reservation to thwart outlaw bikers who are putting hundreds of thousands of lives at risk.Clyde Barr, the drifter with lethal skills, is alone again, wandering the highways of the American West in search of something to believe in. As summer turns to autumn, he trades his car for a horse and heads for the mountains, planning to clear his head and regain his edge with some hunting. But when he runs across an elderly sick man—a Ute Indian from a nearby reservation—Clyde’s dream of solitude is quickly dashed. On the reservation, Clyde finds the old man’s daughter, Lawana, and grandson, Taylor, as well as a group of menacing bikers called Reapers running wild in the economically depressed, half-abandoned village. Gripped by the desire to do good in a hard world, Clyde offers to stay on Lawana’s ranch to help out until her father is released from the hospital. He controls himself around the bikers, even when he sees them harass a few Native American women—but when the Reapers attack a local boy Clyde has to do something. As tensions rise between the locals and the Reapers, Clyde’s efforts to protect the reservation become a fight for his, Lawana’s, and Taylor’s lives. And then the stakes ratchet up even more. In the remote Utah desert, surrounded by enemies, with no law enforcement presence, and with communication effectively cut off, Clyde must find a way to save his new friends, defeat the gang, and, hopefully, escape with his own skin intact. A Promise to Kill is an edge-of-the-seat thriller, pushing its no-hold-barred hero to new levels of improvisation and bare-knuckled blunt force.
The book is rated 3.70/5 at goodreads.com, from 145 ratings. See 32 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2Ce383d.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Cj9KNT.
Google Books preview available in full post.

An action book recommendation: A Promise to Kill: A Clyde Barr Novel by Erik Storey

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CJEJno.
Last year his “Nothing Short of Dying” was widely hailed as the best debut novel in the mystery/crime/thriller genre and his second book released this week equals — some of us will say surpasses — his impressive first.
Book description from Google Books:
From the author dubbed by Jeffery Deaver “a born storyteller” whose first novel Nothing Short of Dying was hailed as “exceptional,” “a rollercoaster read,” and “adrenaline-fueled” by publications on both sides of the Atlantic, this is Erik Storey’s next entry in the Clyde Barr series, a locomotive-paced brawler that has its hero teaming with besieged members of a Native American reservation to thwart outlaw bikers who are putting hundreds of thousands of lives at risk.Clyde Barr, the drifter with lethal skills, is alone again, wandering the highways of the American West in search of something to believe in. As summer turns to autumn, he trades his car for a horse and heads for the mountains, planning to clear his head and regain his edge with some hunting. But when he runs across an elderly sick man—a Ute Indian from a nearby reservation—Clyde’s dream of solitude is quickly dashed. On the reservation, Clyde finds the old man’s daughter, Lawana, and grandson, Taylor, as well as a group of menacing bikers called Reapers running wild in the economically depressed, half-abandoned village. Gripped by the desire to do good in a hard world, Clyde offers to stay on Lawana’s ranch to help out until her father is released from the hospital. He controls himself around the bikers, even when he sees them harass a few Native American women—but when the Reapers attack a local boy Clyde has to do something. As tensions rise between the locals and the Reapers, Clyde’s efforts to protect the reservation become a fight for his, Lawana’s, and Taylor’s lives. And then the stakes ratchet up even more. In the remote Utah desert, surrounded by enemies, with no law enforcement presence, and with communication effectively cut off, Clyde must find a way to save his new friends, defeat the gang, and, hopefully, escape with his own skin intact. A Promise to Kill is an edge-of-the-seat thriller, pushing its no-hold-barred hero to new levels of improvisation and bare-knuckled blunt force.
The book is rated 3.70/5 at goodreads.com, from 145 ratings. See 32 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2Ce383d.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Cj9KNT.
Google Books preview available in full post.

An action book recommendation: The Flight of the Maidens: A Novel by Jane Gardam

A critic review (source Star Tribune) can be read at: http://strib.mn/2D9StXe.
It’s familiar territory, in life and in novels. But what Jane Gardam does, in this novel and in her others, is remind us of how strange the familiar can be when we first encounter it, as each of us must. And finally, that’s even better than charming.
Book description from Google Books:
Deliciously, with keen perception and touching humanity, this new novel from one of England’s most gifted writers follows three young Yorkshire women, all of them scholarship girls, through the weeks preceding their departures for university in Cambridge and London. If they face the future with innocence and uncertainty, their parents and guardians belong in spirit to an England now past, even as they gaze upon a world that has been utterly altered by six long years of war. It is the summer of 1946. In this time of clothing coupons and social readjustment, Hetty Fallowes struggles intellectually to become independent of her possessive and tactless but loving mother, while her best friend, Una Vane, asserts her nascent womanhood with a sexually interesting fellow from the wrong side of the Yorkshire tracks. And Liselotte Klein, a Jewish refugee who arrived fat, solitary, and clever from Hamburg in 1939, comes through painful trials in London and California to surprising possibilties. By summer’s end, all three have begun to learn they know neither everything nor nothing.
The book is rated 3.46/5 at goodreads.com, from 596 ratings. See 111 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C11McJ.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C11T89.

An action book recommendation: The Explorer by Katherine Rundell

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2C4SZH0.
On one level it’s a gripping story of survival and the tenacity of the human spirit against all odds, but it’s also a hymn to hope, love and courage, delivered with all the warmth and wisdom we’ve come to expect from one of our most talented writers for children.
Book description from Google Books:
Parents’ Choice Recommended From Boston Globe–Horn Book Award winner Katherine Rundell comes an exciting new novel about a group of kids who must survive in the Amazon after their plane crashes.Fred, Con, Lila, and Max are on their way back to England from Manaus when the plane they’re on crashes and the pilot dies upon landing. For days they survive alone, until Fred finds a map that leads them to a ruined city, and to a secret.
The book is rated 4.24/5 at goodreads.com, from 375 ratings. See 116 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C60VI5.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C5SxIn.
Google Books preview available in full post.

An action book recommendation: Shark Drunk: The Art of Catching a Large Shark from a Tiny Rubber Dinghy in a Big Ocean by Morten Stroksnes

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CZlS6o.
Its beauty, undemanding science and soothing, musing qualities have made the book a bestseller in Norway and beyond. In vexed times, gently informative escapism is a winner for publishers and a refuge for readers.
Book description from Google Books:
A salty story of friendship, adventure, and the explosive life that teems beneath the ocean The Lofoten archipelago, just North of the Arctic Circle, is a place of unsurpassed beauty–the skyline spikes with dramatic peaks; the radiant greens and purples of the Northern Lights follow summers where the sun never sets. It’s a place of small villages, where the art of fishing, though evolving, is still practiced in traditional ways. Beneath the great depths surrounding these islands lurks the infamous Greenland shark. At twenty-four feet in length and weighing more than a ton, it is truly a beast to behold. But the shark is not known just for its size: Its meat contains a toxin that, when consumed, has been known to make people drunk and hallucinatory. Shark Drunk is the true story of two friends, the author and the eccentric artist Hugo Aasjord, as they embark on a wild pursuit of the famed creature–all from a tiny rubber boat. Together they tackle existential questions and encounter the world’s most powerful maelstrom as they attempt to understand the ocean from every possible angle, drawing on poetry, science, history, ecology, mythology, and their own–sometimes intoxicated–observations, meanwhile pursuing the elusive Greenland shark. By turns thrilling, wise, and hilarious, Shark Drunk is a celebration of adventure, marine life, and, above all, friendship. Winner of the Norwegian Brage Prize 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Critics’ Prize for Literature 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Reine Ord Prize at Lofoten International Literature Festival 2016
The book is rated 4.10/5 at goodreads.com, from 841 ratings. See 129 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D2RvvR.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2BSji2J.

An action book recommendation: Spoonbenders: A novel by Daryl Gregory

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2D34CgA.
The point is that, right here, right now, it may be the Golden Age of Television…but it’s been a long and lonely time if all you’ve wanted, like me, is a well-written, entertaining novel. Something about which the term binging means reading faster, longer. Having grabbed onto Spoonbenders, I am recharged, satiated.
Book description from Google Books:
“Hilarious, heartfelt and brimming with humanity.” –Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney, author of The Nest Teddy Telemachus is a charming con man with a gift for sleight of hand and some shady underground associates. In need of cash, he tricks his way into a classified government study about telekinesis and its possible role in intelligence gathering. There he meets Maureen McKinnon, and it’s not just her piercing blue eyes that leave Teddy forever charmed, but her mind–Maureen is a genuine psychic of immense and mysterious power. After a whirlwind courtship, they marry, have three gifted children, and become the Amazing Telemachus Family, performing astounding feats across the country. Irene is a human lie detector. Frankie can move objects with his mind. And Buddy, the youngest, can see the future. Then one night tragedy leaves the family shattered. Decades later, the Telemachuses are not so amazing. Irene is a single mom whose ear for truth makes it hard to hold down a job, much less hold together a relationship. Frankie’s in serious debt to his dad’s old mob associates. Buddy has completely withdrawn into himself and inexplicably begun digging a hole in the backyard. To make matters worse, the CIA has come knocking, looking to see if there’s any magic left in the Telemachus clan. And there is: Irene’s son Matty has just had his first out-of-body experience. But he hasn’t told anyone, even though his newfound talent might just be what his family needs to save themselves–if it doesn’t tear them apart in the process. Harnessing the imaginative powers that have made him a master storyteller, Daryl Gregory delivers a stunning, laugh-out-loud new novel about a family of gifted dreamers and the invisible forces that bind us all.
The book is rated 4.00/5 at goodreads.com, from 3682 ratings. See 639 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BZq4nL.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D6c6j6.

An action book recommendation: The Flight of the Maidens: A Novel by Jane Gardam

A critic review (source Star Tribune) can be read at: http://strib.mn/2D9StXe.
It’s familiar territory, in life and in novels. But what Jane Gardam does, in this novel and in her others, is remind us of how strange the familiar can be when we first encounter it, as each of us must. And finally, that’s even better than charming.
Book description from Google Books:
Deliciously, with keen perception and touching humanity, this new novel from one of England’s most gifted writers follows three young Yorkshire women, all of them scholarship girls, through the weeks preceding their departures for university in Cambridge and London. If they face the future with innocence and uncertainty, their parents and guardians belong in spirit to an England now past, even as they gaze upon a world that has been utterly altered by six long years of war. It is the summer of 1946. In this time of clothing coupons and social readjustment, Hetty Fallowes struggles intellectually to become independent of her possessive and tactless but loving mother, while her best friend, Una Vane, asserts her nascent womanhood with a sexually interesting fellow from the wrong side of the Yorkshire tracks. And Liselotte Klein, a Jewish refugee who arrived fat, solitary, and clever from Hamburg in 1939, comes through painful trials in London and California to surprising possibilties. By summer’s end, all three have begun to learn they know neither everything nor nothing.
The book is rated 3.46/5 at goodreads.com, from 591 ratings. See 110 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C11McJ.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C11T89.

An action book recommendation: The Midnight Line: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2BWQFll.
Rack your seat back as far as it’ll go, folks, buckle up, and get ready for another bone-jarring, teeth-rattling truck ride with Jack Reacher. Just remember that he won’t stop until his quest is completed, and you won’t stop reading until the last page is turned.
Book description from Google Books:
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * Lee Child returns with a gripping new powerhouse thriller featuring Jack Reacher, “one of this century’s most original, tantalizing pop-fiction heroes” (The Washington Post). Reacher takes a stroll through a small Wisconsin town and sees a class ring in a pawn shop window: West Point 2005. A tough year to graduate: Iraq, then Afghanistan. The ring is tiny, for a woman, and it has her initials engraved on the inside. Reacher wonders what unlucky circumstance made her give up something she earned over four hard years. He decides to find out. And find the woman. And return her ring. Why not? So begins a harrowing journey that takes Reacher through the upper Midwest, from a lowlife bar on the sad side of small town to a dirt-blown crossroads in the middle of nowhere, encountering bikers, cops, crooks, muscle, and a missing persons PI who wears a suit and a tie in the Wyoming wilderness. The deeper Reacher digs, and the more he learns, the more dangerous the terrain becomes. Turns out the ring was just a small link in a far darker chain. Powerful forces are guarding a vast criminal enterprise. Some lines should never be crossed. But then, neither should Reacher. Praise for The Midnight Line “Puts Reacher just where we want him.”–The New York Times Book Review “A gem.”–Chicago Tribune “Compulsively readable.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review) “[A] multifaceted novel about dealing with the unthinkable . . . It’s automatic: Reacher gets off a bus, and Child lands on the New York Times bestseller list.”–Booklist “I just read the new Jack Reacher novel by Lee Child. . . . It is as good as they always are. I read every single one.”–Malcolm Gladwell “The book is very smart . . . [and] suggests something that has not been visible in the series’ previous entries: a creeping sadness in Reacher’s wanderings that, set here among the vast and empty landscapes of Wyoming, resembles the peculiarly solitary loneliness of the classic American hero. This return to form is also a hint of new ground to be covered.”–Kirkus Reviews
The book is rated 4.23/5 at goodreads.com, from 13486 ratings. See 1212 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BUoenT.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D42VQ2.

An action book recommendation: Spoonbenders: A novel by Daryl Gregory

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2D34CgA.
The point is that, right here, right now, it may be the Golden Age of Television…but it’s been a long and lonely time if all you’ve wanted, like me, is a well-written, entertaining novel. Something about which the term binging means reading faster, longer. Having grabbed onto Spoonbenders, I am recharged, satiated.
Book description from Google Books:
“Hilarious, heartfelt and brimming with humanity.” –Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney, author of The Nest Teddy Telemachus is a charming con man with a gift for sleight of hand and some shady underground associates. In need of cash, he tricks his way into a classified government study about telekinesis and its possible role in intelligence gathering. There he meets Maureen McKinnon, and it’s not just her piercing blue eyes that leave Teddy forever charmed, but her mind–Maureen is a genuine psychic of immense and mysterious power. After a whirlwind courtship, they marry, have three gifted children, and become the Amazing Telemachus Family, performing astounding feats across the country. Irene is a human lie detector. Frankie can move objects with his mind. And Buddy, the youngest, can see the future. Then one night tragedy leaves the family shattered. Decades later, the Telemachuses are not so amazing. Irene is a single mom whose ear for truth makes it hard to hold down a job, much less hold together a relationship. Frankie’s in serious debt to his dad’s old mob associates. Buddy has completely withdrawn into himself and inexplicably begun digging a hole in the backyard. To make matters worse, the CIA has come knocking, looking to see if there’s any magic left in the Telemachus clan. And there is: Irene’s son Matty has just had his first out-of-body experience. But he hasn’t told anyone, even though his newfound talent might just be what his family needs to save themselves–if it doesn’t tear them apart in the process. Harnessing the imaginative powers that have made him a master storyteller, Daryl Gregory delivers a stunning, laugh-out-loud new novel about a family of gifted dreamers and the invisible forces that bind us all.
The book is rated 4.00/5 at goodreads.com, from 3646 ratings. See 634 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BZq4nL.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D6c6j6.

An action book recommendation: Here and Gone: A Novel by Haylen Beck

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2BvpIDw.
“Here and Gone” is terrifyingly realistic from the start to its finale. No aspect of the plot feels false, pulling in themes of parenting, greed and desperation.
Book description from Google Books:
Here and Gone is a gripping, wonderfully tense suspense thriller about a mother’s desperate fight to recover her stolen children from corrupt authorities. It begins with a woman fleeing through Arizona with her kids in tow, trying to escape an abusive marriage. When she’s pulled over by an unsettling local sheriff, things soon go awry and she is taken into custody. Only when she gets to the station, her kids are gone. And then the cops start saying they never saw any kids with her, that if they’re gone than she must have done something with them… Meanwhile, halfway across the country a man hears the frenzied news reports about the missing kids, which are eerily similar to events in his own past. As the clock ticks down on the search for the lost children, he too is drawn into the desperate fight for their return.
The book is rated 4.00/5 at goodreads.com, from 2294 ratings. See 721 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BvpMDg.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2jb6tsz.