A business-economics book recommendation: Breaking Rockefeller: The Incredible Story of the Ambitious Rivals Who Toppled an Oil Empire by Peter B. Doran

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dsfFGs.
Mr. Doran captures the risk and adventure characteristic of so much of business conducted at the turn of the last century in countries or regions torn by wars and revolution, none more hostile than the oil-bearing regions of the world…
Book description from Google Books:
The incredible tale of how ambitious oil rivals Marcus Samuel, Jr., and Henri Deterding joined forces to topple the Standard Oil empire   Marcus Samuel, Jr., is an unorthodox Jewish merchant trader. Henri Deterding is a take-no-prisoners oilman. In 1889, John D. Rockefeller is at the peak of his power. Having annihilated all competition and possessing near-total domination of the market, even the U.S. government is wary of challenging the great “anaconda” of Standard Oil. The Standard never loses–that is until Samuel and Deterding team up to form Royal Dutch Shell.   A riveting account of ambition, oil, and greed, Breaking Rockefeller traces Samuel’s rise from outsider to the heights of the British aristocracy, Deterding’s conquest of America, and the collapse of Rockefeller’s monopoly. The beginning of the twentieth century is a time when vast fortunes were made and lost. Taking readers through the rough and tumble of East London’s streets, the twilight turmoil of czarist Russia, to the halls of the British Parliament, and right down Broadway in New York City, Peter Doran offers a richly detailed, fresh perspective on how Samuel and Deterding beat the world’s richest man at his own game.
The book is rated 4.04/5 at goodreads.com, from 216 ratings. See 40 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dsiFlX.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: .

A business-economics book recommendation: A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age by Daniel J. Levitin

A critic review (source The Economist) can be read at: http://econ.st/2uRbvx8.
…if everyone could adopt the level of healthy statistical scepticism that Mr Levitin would like, political debate would be in much better shape. This book is an indispensable trainer.
Book description from Google Books:
From The New York Times bestselling author of The Organized Mind and This is Your Brain on Music, a primer to the critical thinking that is more necessary now than ever. We are bombarded with more information each day than our brains can process–especially in election season. It’s raining bad data, half-truths, and even outright lies. New York Times bestselling author Daniel J. Levitin shows how to recognize misleading announcements, statistics, graphs, and written reports revealing the ways lying weasels can use them. It’s becoming harder to separate the wheat from the digital chaff. How do we distinguish misinformation, pseudo-facts, distortions, and outright lies from reliable information? Levitin groups his field guide into two categories–statistical infomation and faulty arguments–ultimately showing how science is the bedrock of critical thinking. Infoliteracy means understanding that there are hierarchies of source quality and bias that variously distort our information feeds via every media channel, including social media. We may expect newspapers, bloggers, the government, and Wikipedia to be factually and logically correct, but they so often aren’t. We need to think critically about the words and numbers we encounter if we want to be successful at work, at play, and in making the most of our lives. This means checking the plausibility and reasoning–not passively accepting information, repeating it, and making decisions based on it. Readers learn to avoid the extremes of passive gullibility and cynical rejection. Levitin’s charming, entertaining, accessible guide can help anyone wake up to a whole lot of things that aren’t so. And catch some lying weasels in their tracks!  
The book is rated 3.76/5 at goodreads.com, from 1246 ratings. See 236 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uzpmgc.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uyW1mp.

A business-economics book recommendation: Blockchain Revolution: How the Technology Behind Bitcoin Is Changing Money, Business, and the World by Don Tapscott

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2avPKc1.
There are other books on the subject but Blockchain Revolution is a highly readable introduction to a bamboozling but increasingly important field.
Book description from Google Books:
Finalist for the 2017 National Business Book Award The technology likely to have the greatest impact on the future of the world economy has arrived, and it’s not self-driving cars, solar energy, or artificial intelligence. It’s called the blockchain.   The first generation of the digital revolution brought us the Internet of information. The second genera�tion–powered by blockchain technology–is bringing us the Internet of value: a new, distributed platform that can help us reshape the world of business and transform the old order of human affairs for the better.   Blockchain is the ingeniously simple, revolution�ary protocol that allows transactions to be simul�taneously anonymous and secure by maintaining a tamperproof public ledger of value. Though it’s the technology that drives bitcoin and other digital cur�rencies, the underlying framework has the potential to go far beyond these and record virtually everything of value to humankind, from birth and death certifi�cates to insurance claims and even votes.   Why should you care? Maybe you’re a music lover who wants artists to make a living off their art. Or a consumer who wants to know where that hamburger meat really came from. Perhaps you’re an immigrant who’s sick of paying big fees to send money home to loved ones. Or an entrepreneur looking for a new platform to build a business.   And those examples are barely the tip of the ice�berg. This technology is public, encrypted, and readily available for anyone to use. It’s already seeing wide�spread adoption in a number of areas. For example, forty-two (and counting) of the world’s biggest finan�cial institutions, including Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, and Credit Suisse, have formed a consortium to investigate the blockchain for speedier and more secure transactions.   As with major paradigm shifts that preceded it, the blockchain will create winners and losers. And while opportunities abound, the risks of disruption and dislocation must not be ignored. Don Tapscott, the bestselling author of Wikinomics, and his son, blockchain expert Alex Tapscott, bring us a brilliantly researched, highly readable, and utterly foundational book about the future of the modern economy. Blockchain Revolution is the business leaders’ playbook for the next decade and beyond.
The book is rated 3.42/5 at goodreads.com, from 883 ratings. See 135 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2avPTwl.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uoWyWV.

A business-economics book recommendation: The Politicians and the Egalitarians: The Hidden History of American Politics by Sean Wilentz

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2dTCgIE.
…why would he tackle those themes with a string of loosely stitched, previously published essays, many of them book reviews…A well-thought-out book should reflect an author’s ideas, not his résumé.
Book description from Google Books:
One of our most eminent historians reminds us of the commanding role party politics has played in America’s enduring struggle against economic inequality. “There are two keys to unlocking the secrets of American politics and American political history.” So begins The Politicians & the Egalitarians, Princeton historian Sean Wilentz’s bold new work of history. First, America is built on an egalitarian tradition. At the nation’s founding, Americans believed that extremes of wealth and want would destroy their revolutionary experiment in republican government. Ever since, that idea has shaped national political conflict and scored major egalitarian victories’from the Civil War and Progressive eras to the New Deal and the Great Society’along the way. Second, partisanship is a permanent fixture in America, and America is the better for it. Every major egalitarian victory in United States history has resulted neither from abandonment of partisan politics nor from social movement protests but from a convergence of protest and politics, and then sharp struggles led by principled and effective party politicians. There is little to be gained from the dream of a post-partisan world. With these two insights Sean Wilentz offers a crystal-clear portrait of American history, told through politicians and egalitarians including Thomas Paine, Abraham Lincoln, and W. E. B. Du Bois’a portrait that runs counter to current political and historical thinking. As he did with his acclaimed The Rise of American Democracy, Wilentz once again completely transforms our understanding of this nation’s political and moral character.
The book is rated 3.65/5 at goodreads.com, from 69 ratings. See 18 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dTAfwe.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2um0FD4.

A business-economics book recommendation: Fearless As Possible: Under the Circumstances by Denise Donlon

A critic review (source Toronto Star) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2uIM2WD.
a personal history of the music business she loves and a searing look at the Canadian music and broadcasting industries from a bright and well-connected insider.
Book description from Google Books:
2017 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize Finalist In this smart, funny, and inspiring memoir, Donlon chronicles her impressive and storied career, which has put her on the frontlines of the massive changes in the music industry and media. She chronicles her early days at MuchMusic and the music journalism show The NewMusic, where she was a host and producer, and quickly moved up the ranks to become director of music programming, then VP and general manager. Her mandate was relevance, during a time when music videos became a medium that would change pop music and popular culture forever. She became the first female president of Sony Music Canada, where she navigated the crisis in the music industry with the rise of Napster and the new digital revolution. She then joined CBC English Radio as General Manager and Executive Director when the corporation absorbed funding cutbacks, leading to mass reductions in people and programming and leaving a shadow over the future of Canada’s national public broadcaster. Throughout her incredible journey, she shares colourful and entertaining stories of growing up tall, flat, and bullied in east Scarborough; interviewing musical icons such as Keith Richards, Run-DMC, Ice-T, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Annie Lennox, and Sting; working with talent agent Sam Feldman, media pioneer Moses Znaimer, executive vice-president of CBC Radio Richard Stursberg, and her co-host on the current affairs magazine show The Zoomer, Conrad Black. And finally, she details her life-changing experiences with War Child Canada and her work with other charitable organizations, including Live8 and the Clinton Giustra Enterprise Partnership. Told with humour and honesty, Fearless as Possible (Under the Circumstances) is a candid memoir of one woman’s journey, navigating corporate culture with integrity, responsibility, and an irrepressible passion to be a force for good.
The book is rated 4.24/5 at goodreads.com, from 29 ratings. See 5 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uIXtO1.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2ur4Mic.

A business-economics book recommendation: The Politicians and the Egalitarians: The Hidden History of American Politics by Sean Wilentz

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2dTCgIE.
…why would he tackle those themes with a string of loosely stitched, previously published essays, many of them book reviews…A well-thought-out book should reflect an author’s ideas, not his résumé.
Book description from Google Books:
One of our most eminent historians reminds us of the commanding role party politics has played in America’s enduring struggle against economic inequality. “There are two keys to unlocking the secrets of American politics and American political history.” So begins The Politicians & the Egalitarians, Princeton historian Sean Wilentz’s bold new work of history. First, America is built on an egalitarian tradition. At the nation’s founding, Americans believed that extremes of wealth and want would destroy their revolutionary experiment in republican government. Ever since, that idea has shaped national political conflict and scored major egalitarian victories’from the Civil War and Progressive eras to the New Deal and the Great Society’along the way. Second, partisanship is a permanent fixture in America, and America is the better for it. Every major egalitarian victory in United States history has resulted neither from abandonment of partisan politics nor from social movement protests but from a convergence of protest and politics, and then sharp struggles led by principled and effective party politicians. There is little to be gained from the dream of a post-partisan world. With these two insights Sean Wilentz offers a crystal-clear portrait of American history, told through politicians and egalitarians including Thomas Paine, Abraham Lincoln, and W. E. B. Du Bois’a portrait that runs counter to current political and historical thinking. As he did with his acclaimed The Rise of American Democracy, Wilentz once again completely transforms our understanding of this nation’s political and moral character.
The book is rated 3.65/5 at goodreads.com, from 69 ratings. See 18 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dTAfwe.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2um0FD4.

A business-economics book recommendation: Powerhouse: The Untold Story of Hollywood’s Creative Artists Agency by James Andrew Miller

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2cXvOQO.
Perhaps I’m naïve, but I came away from the book with the sense that CAA’s most enduring legacy will be the impact its agents had on the lives and careers of their many clients, amply documented in “Powerhouse.”
Book description from Google Books:
A New York Times bestsellerAn astonishing—and astonishingly entertaining—history of Hollywood’s transformation over the past five decades as seen through the agency at the heart of it all, from the #1 bestselling co-author of Live from New York and Those Guys Have All the Fun.The movies you watch, the TV shows you adore, the concerts and sporting events you attend—behind the curtain of nearly all of these is an immensely powerful and secretive corporation known as Creative Artists Agency. Started in 1975, when five bright and brash employees of a creaky William Morris office left to open their own, strikingly innovative talent agency, CAA would come to revolutionize the entertainment industry, and over the next several decades its tentacles would spread aggressively throughout the worlds of movies, television, music, advertising, and investment banking. Powerhouse is the fascinating, no-holds-barred saga of that ascent. Drawing on unprecedented and exclusive access to the men and women who built and battled with CAA, as well as financial information never before made public, author James Andrew Miller spins a tale of boundless ambition, ruthless egomania, ceaseless empire building, greed, and personal betrayal. It is also a story of prophetic brilliance, magnificent artistry, singular genius, entrepreneurial courage, strategic daring, foxhole brotherhood, and how one firm utterly transformed the entertainment business.Here are the real Star Wars—complete with a Death Star—told through the voices of those who were there. Packed with scores of stars from movies, television, music, and sports, as well as a tremendously compelling cast of agents, studio executives, network chiefs, league commissioners, private equity partners, tech CEOs, and media tycoons, Powerhouse is itself a Hollywood blockbuster of the most spectacular sort.
The book is rated 3.83/5 at goodreads.com, from 891 ratings. See 88 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cXteKH.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tbJuQP.

A business-economics book recommendation: Building the Skyline: The Birth and Growth of Manhattan’s Skyscrapers by Jason M. Barr

A critic review (source The Economist) can be read at: http://econ.st/2cVgBjz.
Economists will appreciate Mr Barr’s careful use of wonky concepts; architects and historians will enjoy his keen eye for detail. But whatever your persuasion, after reading this book you will never look up at a skyscraper the same way again.
Book description from Google Books:
The Manhattan skyline is one of the great wonders of the modern world. But how and why did it form? Much has been written about the city’s architecture and its general history, but little work has explored the economic forces that created the skyline. In Building the Skyline, Jason Barr chronicles the economic history of the Manhattan skyline. In the process, he debunks some widely held misconceptions about the city’s history. Starting with Manhattan’s natural and geological history, Barr moves on to how these formations influenced early land use and the development of neighborhoods, including the dense tenement neighborhoods of Five Points and the Lower East Side, and how these early decisions eventually impacted the location of skyscrapers built during the Skyscraper Revolution at the end of the 19th century. Barr then explores the economic history of skyscrapers and the skyline, investigating the reasons for their heights, frequencies, locations, and shapes. He discusses why skyscrapers emerged downtown and why they appeared three miles to the north in midtown-but not in between the two areas. Contrary to popular belief, this was not due to the depths of Manhattan’s bedrock, nor the presence of Grand Central Station. Rather, midtown’s emergence was a response to the economic and demographic forces that were taking place north of 14th Street after the Civil War. Building the Skyline also presents the first rigorous investigation of the causes of the building boom during the Roaring Twenties. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the boom was largely a rational response to the economic growth of the nation and city. The last chapter investigates the value of Manhattan Island and the relationship between skyscrapers and land prices. Finally, an Epilogue offers policy recommendations for a resilient and robust future skyline.
The book is rated 4.00/5 at goodreads.com, from 10 ratings.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tHfoIJ.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A business-economics book recommendation: Powerhouse: The Untold Story of Hollywood’s Creative Artists Agency by James Andrew Miller

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2cXvOQO.
Perhaps I’m naïve, but I came away from the book with the sense that CAA’s most enduring legacy will be the impact its agents had on the lives and careers of their many clients, amply documented in “Powerhouse.”
Book description from Google Books:
A New York Times bestsellerAn astonishing—and astonishingly entertaining—history of Hollywood’s transformation over the past five decades as seen through the agency at the heart of it all, from the #1 bestselling co-author of Live from New York and Those Guys Have All the Fun.The movies you watch, the TV shows you adore, the concerts and sporting events you attend—behind the curtain of nearly all of these is an immensely powerful and secretive corporation known as Creative Artists Agency. Started in 1975, when five bright and brash employees of a creaky William Morris office left to open their own, strikingly innovative talent agency, CAA would come to revolutionize the entertainment industry, and over the next several decades its tentacles would spread aggressively throughout the worlds of movies, television, music, advertising, and investment banking. Powerhouse is the fascinating, no-holds-barred saga of that ascent. Drawing on unprecedented and exclusive access to the men and women who built and battled with CAA, as well as financial information never before made public, author James Andrew Miller spins a tale of boundless ambition, ruthless egomania, ceaseless empire building, greed, and personal betrayal. It is also a story of prophetic brilliance, magnificent artistry, singular genius, entrepreneurial courage, strategic daring, foxhole brotherhood, and how one firm utterly transformed the entertainment business.Here are the real Star Wars—complete with a Death Star—told through the voices of those who were there. Packed with scores of stars from movies, television, music, and sports, as well as a tremendously compelling cast of agents, studio executives, network chiefs, league commissioners, private equity partners, tech CEOs, and media tycoons, Powerhouse is itself a Hollywood blockbuster of the most spectacular sort.
The book is rated 3.83/5 at goodreads.com, from 890 ratings. See 88 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cXteKH.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tbJuQP.

A business-economics book recommendation: A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age by Daniel J. Levitin

A critic review (source The Economist) can be read at: http://econ.st/2uRbvx8.
…if everyone could adopt the level of healthy statistical scepticism that Mr Levitin would like, political debate would be in much better shape. This book is an indispensable trainer.
Book description from Google Books:
From The New York Times bestselling author of The Organized Mind and This is Your Brain on Music, a primer to the critical thinking that is more necessary now than ever. We are bombarded with more information each day than our brains can process–especially in election season. It’s raining bad data, half-truths, and even outright lies. New York Times bestselling author Daniel J. Levitin shows how to recognize misleading announcements, statistics, graphs, and written reports revealing the ways lying weasels can use them. It’s becoming harder to separate the wheat from the digital chaff. How do we distinguish misinformation, pseudo-facts, distortions, and outright lies from reliable information? Levitin groups his field guide into two categories–statistical infomation and faulty arguments–ultimately showing how science is the bedrock of critical thinking. Infoliteracy means understanding that there are hierarchies of source quality and bias that variously distort our information feeds via every media channel, including social media. We may expect newspapers, bloggers, the government, and Wikipedia to be factually and logically correct, but they so often aren’t. We need to think critically about the words and numbers we encounter if we want to be successful at work, at play, and in making the most of our lives. This means checking the plausibility and reasoning–not passively accepting information, repeating it, and making decisions based on it. Readers learn to avoid the extremes of passive gullibility and cynical rejection. Levitin’s charming, entertaining, accessible guide can help anyone wake up to a whole lot of things that aren’t so. And catch some lying weasels in their tracks!  
The book is rated 3.74/5 at goodreads.com, from 1145 ratings. See 223 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uzpmgc.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uyW1mp.