A business-economics book recommendation: Ghost of the Innocent Man: A True Story of Trial and Redemption by Benjamin Rachlin

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2CnU8IW.
Read Rachlin’s Ghost of the Innocent Man to follow the twisted path that led Chris Mumma to pick up Grimes’ file, ultimately exposing the use of outdated photos to mis-identify the perpetrator…
Book description from Google Books:
A Library Journal Top Ten Book of the YearA National Public Radio Great Read for 2017″Remarkable . . . Captivating . . . Rachlin is a skilled storyteller.” –New York Times Book Review”A gripping legal-thriller mystery . . . Profoundly elevates good-cause advocacy to greater heights–to where innocent lives are saved.” –USA Today”A crisply written page turner.” –NPRA gripping account of one man’s long road to freedom that will forever change how we understand our criminal justice systemDuring the last three decades, more than two thousand American citizens have been wrongfully convicted. Ghost of the Innocent Man brings us one of the most dramatic of those cases and provides the clearest picture yet of the national scourge of wrongful conviction and of the opportunity for meaningful reform.When the final gavel clapped in a rural southern courtroom in the summer of 1988, Willie J. Grimes, a gentle spirit with no record of violence, was shocked and devastated to be convicted of first-degree rape and sentenced to life imprisonment. Here is the story of this everyman and his extraordinary quarter-century-long journey to freedom, told in breathtaking and sympathetic detail, from the botched evidence and suspect testimony that led to his incarceration to the tireless efforts to prove his innocence and the identity of the true perpetrator. These were spearheaded by his relentless champion, Christine Mumma, a cofounder of North Carolina’s Innocence Inquiry Commission. That commission–unprecedented at its inception in 2006–remains a model organization unlike any other in the country, and one now responsible for a growing number of exonerations.With meticulous, prismatic research and pulse-quickening prose, Benjamin Rachlin presents one man’s tragedy and triumph. The jarring and unsettling truth is that the story of Willie J. Grimes, for all its outrage, dignity, and grace, is not a unique travesty. But through the harrowing and suspenseful account of one life, told from the inside, we experience the full horror of wrongful conviction on a national scale. Ghost of the Innocent Man is both rare and essential, a masterwork of empathy. The book offers a profound reckoning not only with the shortcomings of our criminal justice system but also with its possibilities for redemption.
The book is rated 4.46/5 at goodreads.com, from 169 ratings. See 56 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2CMRKwd.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2CPaKub.

A business-economics book recommendation: The Chickenshit Club: Why the Justice Department Fails to Prosecute Executives by Jesse Eisinger

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2D7zOvo.
This book is a wakeup call, delivered calmly yet with no shortage of well-reasoned urgency, to a nation whose democratic traditions are being undermined by backroom dealing, deregulation, and the consolidation of corporate power. It’s a chilling read, and a needed one.
Book description from Google Books:
From Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Jesse Eisinger, “a fast moving, fly-on-the-wall, disheartening look at the deterioration of the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission…It is a book of superheroes” (San Franscisco Review of Books).Why were no bankers put in prison after the financial crisis of 2008? Why do CEOs seem to commit wrongdoing with impunity? The problem goes beyond banks deemed “Too Big to Fail” to almost every large corporation in America—to pharmaceutical companies and auto manufacturers and beyond. The Chickenshit Club—an inside reference to prosecutors too scared of failure and too daunted by legal impediments to do their jobs—explains why in “an absorbing financial history, a monumental work of journalism…a first-rate study of the federal bureaucracy” (Bloomberg Businessweek). Jesse Eisigner begins the story in the 1970s, when the government pioneered the notion that top corporate executives, not just seedy crooks, could commit heinous crimes and go to prison. He brings us to trading desks on Wall Street, to corporate boardrooms and the offices of prosecutors and FBI agents. These revealing looks provide context for the evolution of the Justice Department’s approach to pursuing corporate criminals through the early 2000s and into the Justice Department’s approach to pursuing corporate criminals through the early 2000s and into the Justice Department of today, including the prosecutorial fiascos, corporate lobbying, trial losses, and culture shifts that have stripped the government of the will and ability to prosecute top corporate executives. “Brave and elegant….a fearless reporter…Eisinger’s important and profound book takes no prisoners (The Washington Post). Exposing one of the most important scandals of our time, The Chickenshit Club provides a clear, detailed explanation as to how our Justice Department has come to avoid, bungle, and mismanage the fight to bring these alleged criminals to justice. “This book is a wakeup call…a chilling read, and a needed one” (NPR.org).
The book is rated 3.83/5 at goodreads.com, from 409 ratings. See 83 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D5GZEs.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2BYLOzT.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A business-economics book recommendation: Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History by Kurt Andersen

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2zxbKkf.
…as he dissects everything from the Salem witch hunts to Scientology, he manages to present a frighteningly convincing and sometimes uproarious picture of a country in steep, perhaps terminal decline that would have the founding fathers weeping into their beards.
Book description from Google Books:
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “The single most important explanation, and the fullest explanation, of how Donald Trump became president of the United States . . . nothing less than the most important book that I have read this year.”—Lawrence O’Donnell How did we get here? In this sweeping, eloquent history of America, Kurt Andersen shows that what’s happening in our country today—this post-factual, “fake news” moment we’re all living through—is not something new, but rather the ultimate expression of our national character. America was founded by wishful dreamers, magical thinkers, and true believers, by hucksters and their suckers. Fantasy is deeply embedded in our DNA. Over the course of five centuries—from the Salem witch trials to Scientology to the Satanic Panic of the 1980s, from P. T. Barnum to Hollywood and the anything-goes, wild-and-crazy sixties, from conspiracy theories to our fetish for guns and obsession with extraterrestrials—our love of the fantastic has made America exceptional in a way that we’ve never fully acknowledged. From the start, our ultra-individualism was attached to epic dreams and epic fantasies—every citizen was free to believe absolutely anything, or to pretend to be absolutely anybody. With the gleeful erudition and tell-it-like-it-is ferocity of a Christopher Hitchens, Andersen explores whether the great American experiment in liberty has gone off the rails. Fantasyland could not appear at a more perfect moment. If you want to understand Donald Trump and the culture of twenty-first-century America, if you want to know how the lines between reality and illusion have become dangerously blurred, you must read this book.Praise for Fantasyland “With this rousing book, [Kurt] Andersen proves to be the kind of clear-eyed critic an anxious country needs in the midst of a national crisis.”—San Francisco Chronicle“A frighteningly convincing and sometimes uproarious picture of a country in steep, perhaps terminal decline that would have the founding fathers weeping into their beards.”—The Guardian “This is an important book—the indispensable book—for understanding America in the age of Trump. It’s an eye-opening history filled with brilliant insights, a saga of how we were always susceptible to fantasy, from the Puritan fanatics to the talk-radio and Internet wackos who mix show business, hucksterism, and conspiracy theories.”—Walter Isaacson, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Leonardo da Vinci
The book is rated 4.19/5 at goodreads.com, from 788 ratings. See 191 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2AhmXGD.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Ahn3Ov.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A business-economics book recommendation: Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do about It by Richard V. Reeves

A critic review (source The Economist) can be read at: http://econ.st/2BoQTzY.
It is a stinging point, and well delivered. “Dream Hoarders” is a slim and engaging book which can be read in an afternoon, but whose message lingers for longer. But it is hardly the final word on American inequality.
Book description from Google Books:
America is becoming a class-based society. It is now conventional wisdom to focus on the wealth of the top 1 percent–especially the top 0.01 percent–and how the ultra-rich are concentrating income and prosperity while incomes for most other Americans are stagnant. But the most important, consequential, and widening gap in American society is between the upper middle class and everyone else. Reeves defines the upper middle class as those whose incomes are in the top 20 percent of American society. Income is not the only way to measure a society, but in a market economy it is crucial because access to money generally determines who gets the best quality education, housing, health care, and other necessary goods and services. As Reeves shows, the growing separation between the upper middle class and everyone else can be seen in family structure, neighborhoods, attitudes, and lifestyle. Those at the top of the income ladder are becoming more effective at passing on their status to their children, reducing overall social mobility. The result is not just an economic divide but a fracturing of American society along class lines. Upper-middle-class children become upper-middle-class adults. These trends matter because the separation and perpetuation of the upper middle class corrode prospects for more progressive approaches to policy. Various forms of “opportunity hoarding” among the upper middle class make it harder for others to rise up to the top rung. Examples include zoning laws and schooling, occupational licensing, college application procedures, and the allocation of internships. Upper-middle-class opportunity hoarding, Reeves argues, results in a less competitive economy as well as a less open society. Inequality is inevitable and can even be good, within limits. But Reeves argues that society can take effective action to reduce opportunity hoarding and thus promote broader opportunity. This fascinating book shows how American society has become the very class-defined society that earlier Americans rebelled against–and what can be done to restore a more equitable society.
The book is rated 3.69/5 at goodreads.com, from 491 ratings. See 91 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BoR2U2.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Bqclok.

A business-economics book recommendation: Haiti: The Tumultuous History – From Pearl of the Caribbean to Broken Nation by Philippe Girard

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2jtvgHD.
…but “Toussaint Louverture,” by Philippe Girard, is only the second in English to draw deeply on the original documents. The book is superb, though perhaps not in every way.
Book description from Google Books:
Why has Haiti been plagued by so many woes? Why have multiple U.S. efforts to create a stable democracy in Haiti failed so spectacularly? Philippe Girard answers these and other questions, examining how colonialism and slavery have left a legacy of racial tension, both within Haiti and internationally; Haitians remain deeply suspicious of white foriegners’ motives, many of whom doubt Hatians’ ability to govern themselves. He also examines how Haiti’s current political instability is merely a continuation of political strife that began during the War of Independence (1791-1804). Finally, Haiti: The Tumultuous History, Girard explores poverty’s devastating impact on contemporary Haiti and argues that Haitians–particularly home-grown dictators–bear a big share of the responsibility for their nation’s troubles.
The book is rated 3.87/5 at goodreads.com, from 158 ratings. See 29 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2i1vuFy.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2hYHK9E.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A business-economics book recommendation: Haiti: The Tumultuous History – From Pearl of the Caribbean to Broken Nation by Philippe Girard

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2jtvgHD.
…but “Toussaint Louverture,” by Philippe Girard, is only the second in English to draw deeply on the original documents. The book is superb, though perhaps not in every way.
Book description from Google Books:
Why has Haiti been plagued by so many woes? Why have multiple U.S. efforts to create a stable democracy in Haiti failed so spectacularly? Philippe Girard answers these and other questions, examining how colonialism and slavery have left a legacy of racial tension, both within Haiti and internationally; Haitians remain deeply suspicious of white foriegners’ motives, many of whom doubt Hatians’ ability to govern themselves. He also examines how Haiti’s current political instability is merely a continuation of political strife that began during the War of Independence (1791-1804). Finally, Haiti: The Tumultuous History, Girard explores poverty’s devastating impact on contemporary Haiti and argues that Haitians–particularly home-grown dictators–bear a big share of the responsibility for their nation’s troubles.
The book is rated 3.87/5 at goodreads.com, from 158 ratings. See 29 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2i1vuFy.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2hYHK9E.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A business-economics book recommendation: Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History by Kurt Andersen

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2zxbKkf.
…as he dissects everything from the Salem witch hunts to Scientology, he manages to present a frighteningly convincing and sometimes uproarious picture of a country in steep, perhaps terminal decline that would have the founding fathers weeping into their beards.
Book description from Google Books:
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “The single most important explanation, and the fullest explanation, of how Donald Trump became president of the United States . . . nothing less than the most important book that I have read this year.”—Lawrence O’Donnell How did we get here? In this sweeping, eloquent history of America, Kurt Andersen shows that what’s happening in our country today—this post-factual, “fake news” moment we’re all living through—is not something new, but rather the ultimate expression of our national character. America was founded by wishful dreamers, magical thinkers, and true believers, by hucksters and their suckers. Fantasy is deeply embedded in our DNA. Over the course of five centuries—from the Salem witch trials to Scientology to the Satanic Panic of the 1980s, from P. T. Barnum to Hollywood and the anything-goes, wild-and-crazy sixties, from conspiracy theories to our fetish for guns and obsession with extraterrestrials—our love of the fantastic has made America exceptional in a way that we’ve never fully acknowledged. From the start, our ultra-individualism was attached to epic dreams and epic fantasies—every citizen was free to believe absolutely anything, or to pretend to be absolutely anybody. With the gleeful erudition and tell-it-like-it-is ferocity of a Christopher Hitchens, Andersen explores whether the great American experiment in liberty has gone off the rails. Fantasyland could not appear at a more perfect moment. If you want to understand Donald Trump and the culture of twenty-first-century America, if you want to know how the lines between reality and illusion have become dangerously blurred, you must read this book.Praise for Fantasyland “With this rousing book, [Kurt] Andersen proves to be the kind of clear-eyed critic an anxious country needs in the midst of a national crisis.”—San Francisco Chronicle“A frighteningly convincing and sometimes uproarious picture of a country in steep, perhaps terminal decline that would have the founding fathers weeping into their beards.”—The Guardian “This is an important book—the indispensable book—for understanding America in the age of Trump. It’s an eye-opening history filled with brilliant insights, a saga of how we were always susceptible to fantasy, from the Puritan fanatics to the talk-radio and Internet wackos who mix show business, hucksterism, and conspiracy theories.”—Walter Isaacson, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Leonardo da Vinci
The book is rated 4.19/5 at goodreads.com, from 758 ratings. See 187 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2AhmXGD.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Ahn3Ov.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A business-economics book recommendation: The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds by Michael Lewis

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2p0F7ce.
Lewis is the ideal teller of the story. Dating to his 1989 debut, “Liar’s Poker,” about the Wall Street boom of that decade, he has displayed a rare combination for a writer. He immerses himself in big ideas…
Book description from Google Books:
“Brilliant. . . . Lewis has given us a spectacular account of two great men who faced up to uncertainty and the limits of human reason.” —William Easterly, Wall Street Journal Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original papers that invented the field of behavioral economics. One of the greatest partnerships in the history of science, Kahneman and Tversky’s extraordinary friendship incited a revolution in Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis’s own work possible. In The Undoing Project, Lewis shows how their Nobel Prize–winning theory of the mind altered our perception of reality.
The book is rated 3.99/5 at goodreads.com, from 18723 ratings. See 1878 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2p0H9cv.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2p0lO2C.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A business-economics book recommendation: The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite by Duff McDonald

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2ixt3dJ.
McDonald bookends his long and impressively researched account with a portrait of Casey Gerald, an African-American who delivered a 2014 Class Day speech that’s been viewed online over 200,000 times, and is featured on the school’s “Making a Difference” website.
Book description from Google Books:
A riveting and timely intellectual history of one of our most important capitalist institutions, Harvard Business School, from the bestselling author of The Firm.With The Firm, financial journalist Duff McDonald pulled back the curtain on consulting giant McKinsey & Company. In The Golden Passport, he reveals the inner workings of a singular nexus of power, ambition, and influence: Harvard Business School. Harvard University occupies a unique place in the public’s imagination, but HBS has arguably eclipsed its parent in terms of its influence on modern society. A Harvard degree guarantees respect. An HBS degree is, as the New York Times proclaimed in 1978, “the golden passport to life in the upper class.” Those holding Harvard MBAs are near-guaranteed entrance into Western capitalism’s most powerful realm—the corner office.Most people have a vague knowledge of the power of the HBS network, but few understand the dynamics that have made HBS an indestructible and powerful force for almost a century. As McDonald explores these dynamics, he also reveals how, despite HBS’s enormous success, it has failed with respect to the stated goal of its founders: “the multiplication of men who will handle their current business problems in socially constructive ways.” While HBS graduates tend to be very good at whatever they do, that is rarely the doing of good.In addition to teasing out the essence of this exclusive, if not necessarily “secret” club, McDonald explores two important questions: Has the school failed at reaching the goals it set for itself? And is HBS therefore complicit in the moral failings of Western capitalism? At a time of pronounced economic disparity and political unrest, this hard-hitting yet fair portrait offers a much-needed look at an institution that has a profound influence on the shape of our society and all our lives.
The book is rated 3.25/5 at goodreads.com, from 105 ratings. See 24 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2izwpgn.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2izwxMT.

A business-economics book recommendation: The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite by Duff McDonald

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2ixt3dJ.
McDonald bookends his long and impressively researched account with a portrait of Casey Gerald, an African-American who delivered a 2014 Class Day speech that’s been viewed online over 200,000 times, and is featured on the school’s “Making a Difference” website.
Book description from Google Books:
A riveting and timely intellectual history of one of our most important capitalist institutions, Harvard Business School, from the bestselling author of The Firm.With The Firm, financial journalist Duff McDonald pulled back the curtain on consulting giant McKinsey & Company. In The Golden Passport, he reveals the inner workings of a singular nexus of power, ambition, and influence: Harvard Business School. Harvard University occupies a unique place in the public’s imagination, but HBS has arguably eclipsed its parent in terms of its influence on modern society. A Harvard degree guarantees respect. An HBS degree is, as the New York Times proclaimed in 1978, “the golden passport to life in the upper class.” Those holding Harvard MBAs are near-guaranteed entrance into Western capitalism’s most powerful realm—the corner office.Most people have a vague knowledge of the power of the HBS network, but few understand the dynamics that have made HBS an indestructible and powerful force for almost a century. As McDonald explores these dynamics, he also reveals how, despite HBS’s enormous success, it has failed with respect to the stated goal of its founders: “the multiplication of men who will handle their current business problems in socially constructive ways.” While HBS graduates tend to be very good at whatever they do, that is rarely the doing of good.In addition to teasing out the essence of this exclusive, if not necessarily “secret” club, McDonald explores two important questions: Has the school failed at reaching the goals it set for itself? And is HBS therefore complicit in the moral failings of Western capitalism? At a time of pronounced economic disparity and political unrest, this hard-hitting yet fair portrait offers a much-needed look at an institution that has a profound influence on the shape of our society and all our lives.
The book is rated 3.25/5 at goodreads.com, from 105 ratings. See 24 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2izwpgn.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2izwxMT.