A crime book recommendation: Razor Girl: A novel by Carl Hiaasen

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2dJjSW5.
Carl Hiaasen’s irresistible “Razor Girl” meets his usual sky-high standards for elegance, craziness and mike-drop humor. But this election-year novel is exceptionally timely, too.
Book description from Google Books:
“When Lane Coolman’s car is bashed from behind on the road to the Florida Keys, what appears to be an innocent accident is anything but (this is Hiaasen!). Behind the wheel of the offending car is Merry Mansfield–the eponymous Razor Girl–so named for her unique, eye-popping addition to what might be an otherwise unexciting scam. But, of course–this is Hiaasen!–the scam is only the very beginning of a situation that’s going to spiral crazily out of control while gathering in some of the wildest characters Hiaasen has ever set loose on the page. There’s the owner of Sedimental Journey–the company that steals sand from one beach to restore erosion on another…Dominick “Big Noogie” Aeola, the NYC mafia capo with a taste for the pinkest of sands…Zeto, the small-time hustler who gets electrocuted trying to charge a Tesla…Nance Buck, native Wisconsinite who’s nonetheless the star of the red neck reality TV show, “Bayou Brethren.”..a psycho who goes by the name of Blister and who’s more Nance Buck than Buck could ever be…the multimillionaire product liability lawyer who’s getting dangerously–and deformingly–hooked on the very product he’s litigating against…and Andrew Yancy–formerly Detective Yancy, busted to Key West roach patrol after he beat up his then-lover’s husband with a Dustbuster–who’s convinced that if he can just solve one more murder on his own, he’ll get his detective badge back. That the Razor Girl may be the key to his success in this deeply ill-considered endeavor will be as surprising to him as anything else he encounters along the way–including the nine-pound Gambian pouched rats getting very used to the good life in the Keys… “–
The book is rated 3.83/5 at goodreads.com, from 9305 ratings. See 1379 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2eDUnDz.
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A crime book recommendation: Liberty Street by Dianne Warren

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2ezjqaK.
Warren’s crisp, evocative and controlled prose allows the highly charged emotions of her characters space to breathe. The frustrations and simmering racist violence underlying the community are powerfully conveyed…
Book description from Google Books:
From the Governor General’s Award-winning author of Cool Water, a poignant and often witty new novel about rash acts and altered lives.When sharp-edged Frances Moon and her long-time partner encounter a funeral procession that brings traffic to a halt, she finds herself blurting out the barest thread of a story that she never intended to share. The reverberations drive her back to the past and her mother’s old rental property, the lone house in a failed subdivision called Liberty Street.There, memories are ghosts: Frances’s mother on her way to Nashville to become a country singer; her father determined to run his farm despite his failing eyesight; the town’s bad apple, Dooley Sullivan; a string of renters including the December bride, Esme Bigalow, and a man who met a tragic end, Silas Chance.When a domestic mishap and a torrential hailstorm send Frances to the questionable safety of an eccentric neighbour’s kitchen, she learns just how unreliable memory is, and that she was not the only one whose life after Elliot, Saskatchewan was determined by half-truths and bad decisions.With depth, insight and the subtle humour for which she is known, Dianne Warren gives us an engrossing and touching new novel about disappointment, anger and the redemptive power of kindness.
The book is rated 3.64/5 at goodreads.com, from 196 ratings. See 52 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ezjgzV.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tOXJug.

A crime book recommendation: One or the Other (An Eddie Dougherty Mystery) by John McFetridge

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dzTGNU.
The cover copy calls One or the Other a mystery and in fact Dougherty spends a lot of time investigating a killing. But the book reads more like a sweet love letter to the Montreal of four decades ago.
Book description from Google Books:
“An extremely good crime novel, brimming with historical verisimilitude . . . with a richly detailed protagonist and a seriously compelling mystery.” – Booklist on Black Rock In the weeks before hosting the 1976 Summer Olympics, the Montreal police are tightening security to prevent another catastrophe like the ’72 games in Munich. But it isn’t tight enough to stop nearly three million dollars being stolen in a bold daytime Brink’s truck robbery. As the high-profile heist continues to baffle the police, Constable Eddie Dougherty gets a chance to prove his worth as a detective when he’s assigned to assist the suburban Longueuil force in investigating the deaths of two teenagers returning from a rock concert across the Jacques Cartier Bridge. Were they mugged and thrown from the bridge? Or was it a murder-suicide? With tensions running high in the city and his future career at stake, Dougherty faces the limits of the force and of his own policing, and has to decide when to settle and when justice is the only thing that should be obeyed.
The book is rated 3.89/5 at goodreads.com, from 19 ratings. See 7 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2es7jfC.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sjTbfQ.

A crime book recommendation: Liberty Street by Dianne Warren

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2ezjqaK.
Warren’s crisp, evocative and controlled prose allows the highly charged emotions of her characters space to breathe. The frustrations and simmering racist violence underlying the community are powerfully conveyed…
Book description from Google Books:
From the Governor General’s Award-winning author of Cool Water, a poignant and often witty new novel about rash acts and altered lives.When sharp-edged Frances Moon and her long-time partner encounter a funeral procession that brings traffic to a halt, she finds herself blurting out the barest thread of a story that she never intended to share. The reverberations drive her back to the past and her mother’s old rental property, the lone house in a failed subdivision called Liberty Street.There, memories are ghosts: Frances’s mother on her way to Nashville to become a country singer; her father determined to run his farm despite his failing eyesight; the town’s bad apple, Dooley Sullivan; a string of renters including the December bride, Esme Bigalow, and a man who met a tragic end, Silas Chance.When a domestic mishap and a torrential hailstorm send Frances to the questionable safety of an eccentric neighbour’s kitchen, she learns just how unreliable memory is, and that she was not the only one whose life after Elliot, Saskatchewan was determined by half-truths and bad decisions.With depth, insight and the subtle humour for which she is known, Dianne Warren gives us an engrossing and touching new novel about disappointment, anger and the redemptive power of kindness.
The book is rated 3.64/5 at goodreads.com, from 196 ratings. See 52 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ezjgzV.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tOXJug.

A crime book recommendation: Mississippi Blood: A Novel (Natchez Burning) by Greg Iles

A critic review (source Financial Times) can be read at: http://on.ft.com/2s3Wafq.
Operatic in its reach, this is still essentially a tough crime procedural, with courtroom drama that is far more blistering than the John Grisham variety. Mississippi Blood is Southern Gothic delivered in the most incarnadine of hues.
Book description from Google Books:
The #1 New York Times BestsellerThe final installment in the epic Natchez Burning trilogy by Greg Iles“Natchez Burning is extraordinarily entertaining and fiendishly suspenseful. I defy you to start it and find a way to put it down; as long as it is, I wished it were longer. . . . This is an amazing work of popular fiction.”   — Stephen King“One of the longest, most successful sustained works of popular fiction in recent memory… Prepare to be surprised. Iles has always been an exceptional storyteller, and he has invested these volumes with an energy and sense of personal urgency that rarely, if ever, falter.”—    Washington PostThe endgame is at hand for Penn Cage, his family, and the enemies bent on destroying them in this revelatory volume in the epic trilogy set in modern-day Natchez, Mississippi—Greg Iles’s epic tale of love and honor, hatred and revenge that explores how the sins of the past continue to haunt the present.Shattered by grief and dreaming of vengeance, Penn Cage sees his family and his world collapsing around him. The woman he loves is gone, his principles have been irrevocably compromised, and his father, once a paragon of the community that Penn leads as mayor, is about to be tried for the murder of a former lover. Most terrifying of all, Dr. Cage seems bent on self-destruction. Despite Penn’s experience as a prosecutor in major murder trials, his father has frozen him out of the trial preparations–preferring to risk dying in prison to revealing the truth of the crime to his son. During forty years practicing medicine, Tom Cage made himself the most respected and beloved physician in Natchez, Mississippi. But this revered Southern figure has secrets known only to himself and a handful of others.  Among them, Tom has a second son, the product of an 1960s affair with his devoted African American nurse, Viola Turner.  It is Viola who has been murdered, and her bitter son–Penn’s half-brother–who sets in motion the murder case against his father.  The resulting investigation exhumes dangerous ghosts from Mississippi’s violent past. In some way that Penn cannot fathom, Viola Turner was a nexus point between his father and the Double Eagles, a savage splinter cell of the KKK. More troubling still, the long-buried secrets shared by Dr. Cage and the former Klansmen may hold the key to the most devastating assassinations of the 1960s. The surviving Double Eagles will stop at nothing to keep their past crimes buried, and with the help of some of the most influential men in the state, they seek to ensure that Dr. Cage either takes the fall for them, or takes his secrets to an early grave.  Unable to trust anyone around him–not even his own mother–Penn joins forces with Serenity Butler, a famous young black author who has come to Natchez to write about his father’s case. Together, Penn and Serenity battle to crack the Double Eagles and discover the secret history of the Cage family and the South itself, a desperate move that risks the only thing they have left to gamble: their lives. Mississippi Blood is the enthralling conclusion to a breathtaking trilogy seven years in the making–one that has kept readers on the edge of their seats. With piercing insight, narrative prowess, and a masterful ability to blend history and imagination, Greg Iles illuminates the brutal history of the American South in a highly atmospheric and suspenseful novel that delivers the shocking resolution his fans have eagerly awaited. 
The book is rated 4.52/5 at goodreads.com, from 6792 ratings. See 896 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2s3t3c6.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2s3RUN7.

A crime book recommendation: Since We Fell: A Novel by Dennis Lehane

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2swj77Y.
Other than the predictable complications caused by her agoraphobia, her responses to the terrible things suddenly destroying her life seem almost completely reactionary, drawing little on the subtleties of character Lehane spent so much time developing in the first half of the novel…Nonetheless, Since We Fell is a ride you won’t want to miss.
Book description from Google Books:
The new novel from New York Times bestseller Dennis Lehane, author of Mystic River and Shutter Island“Lehane is the master of complex human characters thrust into suspenseful, page-turning situations.” —Gillian FlynnSince We Fell follows Rachel Childs, a former journalist who, after an on-air mental breakdown, now lives as a virtual shut-in. In all other respects, however, she enjoys an ideal life with an ideal husband. Until a chance encounter on a rainy afternoon causes that ideal life to fray. As does Rachel’s marriage. As does Rachel herself. Sucked into a conspiracy thick with deception, violence, and possibly madness, Rachel must find the strength within herself to conquer unimaginable fears and mind-altering truths. By turns heart- breaking, suspenseful, romantic, and sophisticated, Since We Fell is a novel of profound psychological insight and tension. It is Dennis Lehane at his very best.
The book is rated 3.69/5 at goodreads.com, from 7607 ratings. See 1211 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2tOERzD.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2svPgwx.

A crime book recommendation: True Believer: Stalin’s Last American Spy by Kati Marton

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2dN6WyB.
As vividly reconstructed by Marton, Noel Field’s life is a window on the delusion and narcissism that fuel the self-radicalized of any era.
Book description from Google Books:
“Relevant…fascinating…vividly reconstructed.” —The New York Times Book Review “Riveting reading…a mesmerizing look at Cold War espionage.” —USA TODAY This astonishing real-life spy thriller, filled with danger, misplaced loyalties, betrayal, treachery, and pure evil, with a plot twist worthy of John le Carré, is relevant today as a tale of fanaticism and the lengths it takes us to.True Believer reveals the life of Noel Field, an American who betrayed his country and crushed his family. Field, once a well-meaning and privileged American, spied for Stalin during the 1930s and ’40s. Then, a pawn in Stalin’s sinister master strategy, Field was kidnapped and tortured by the KGB and forced to testify against his own Communist comrades. How does an Ivy League-educated, US State Department employee, deeply rooted in American culture and history, become a hardcore Stalinist? The 1930s, when Noel Field joined the secret underground of the International Communist Movement, were a time of national collapse: ten million Americans unemployed, rampant racism, retreat from the world just as fascism was gaining ground, and Washington—pre FDR—parched of fresh ideas. Communism promised the righting of social and political wrongs and many in Field’s generation were seduced by its siren song. Few, however, went as far as Noel Field in betraying their own country. With a reporter’s eye for detail, and a historian’s grasp of the cataclysmic events of the twentieth century, Kati Marton captures Field’s riveting quest for a life of meaning that went horribly wrong. True Believer is supported by unprecedented access to Field family correspondence, Soviet Secret Police records, and reporting on key players from Alger Hiss, CIA Director Allen Dulles, and World War II spy master, “Wild Bill” Donovan—to the most sinister of all: Josef Stalin. A story of another time, this is a tale relevant for all times.
The book is rated 3.74/5 at goodreads.com, from 242 ratings. See 49 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dN91KT.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2szMwOB.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A crime book recommendation: Night School: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2lhP3MK.
Unlike most Reacher books, which start at breathless velocity and then wind up having to work through huge, empty action scenes later, this one gets better as it goes along. Its complexity pays off with a better than usual MacGuffin and real teamwork against a global enemy.
Book description from Google Books:
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER – The incomparable hero of Jack Reacher: Never Go Back takes readers to school in his most explosive novel yet. After eleven straight global #1 bestsellers, discover the thrillers that The New York Times calls “utterly addictive.” It’s 1996, and Reacher is still in the army. In the morning they give him a medal, and in the afternoon they send him back to school. That night he’s off the grid. Out of sight, out of mind. Two other men are in the classroom–an FBI agent and a CIA analyst. Each is a first-rate operator, each is fresh off a big win, and each is wondering what the hell they are doing there. Then they find out: A Jihadist sleeper cell in Hamburg, Germany, has received an unexpected visitor–a Saudi courier, seeking safe haven while waiting to rendezvous with persons unknown. A CIA asset, undercover inside the cell, has overheard the courier whisper a chilling message: “The American wants a hundred million dollars.” For what? And who from? Reacher and his two new friends are told to find the American. Reacher recruits the best soldier he has ever worked with: Sergeant Frances Neagley. Their mission heats up in more ways than one, while always keeping their eyes on the prize: If they don’t get their man, the world will suffer an epic act of terrorism. From Langley to Hamburg, Jalalabad to Kiev, Night School moves like a bullet through a treacherous landscape of double crosses, faked identities, and new and terrible enemies, as Reacher maneuvers inside the game and outside the law. Praise for Night School “The prose is crisp and clean, and the fighting is realistic. . . . This latest installment has all the classic ingredients: a great setting (Hamburg), a good villain, and a mystery that draws you in efficiently, escalates unpredictably, and has a satisfying resolution.”–The New Yorker “Another timely tour de force . . . The taut thriller is textbook [Lee] Child: fast-paced and topical with a ‘ripped from the headlines’ feel.”–Minneapolis Star-Tribune “As gripping as ever.”–The Florida Times-Union Praise for #1 bestselling author Lee Child and his Jack Reacher series “Reacher [is] one of this century’s most original, tantalizing pop-fiction heroes.”–The Washington Post
The book is rated 3.96/5 at goodreads.com, from 26451 ratings. See 2340 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2kvawh4.
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A crime book recommendation: The Lost Order: A Novel (Cotton Malone) by Steve Berry

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2s0Nbvr.
Berry’s fans will love his latest endeavor as he brings more detail into Malone’s past and how he came to be known as Cotton. The villains are a bit over the top, and their ultimate goal is somewhat confusing, but it doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things.
Book description from Google Books:
The Knights of the Golden Circle was the largest and most dangerous clandestine organization in American history. It amassed billions in stolen gold and silver, all buried in hidden caches across the United States. Since 1865 treasure hunters have searched, but little of that immense wealth has ever been found.Now, one hundred and sixty years later, two factions of what remains of the Knights of the Golden Circle want that lost treasure—one to spend it for their own ends, the other to preserve it. Thrust into this battle is former Justice Department agent Cotton Malone, whose connection to the knights is far deeper than he ever imagined. At the center is the Smithsonian Institution—linked to the knights, its treasure, and Malone himself through an ancestor, a Confederate spy named Angus “Cotton” Adams, whose story holds the key to everything. Complicating matters are the political ambitions of a reckless Speaker of the House and the bitter widow of a United States Senator, who together are planning radical changes to the country. And while Malone and Cassiopeia Vitt face the past, ex-president Danny Daniels and Stephanie Nelle confront a new and unexpected challenge, a threat that may cost one of them their life. From the backrooms of the Smithsonian to the deepest woods in rural Arkansas, and finally up into the rugged mountains of northern New Mexico, The Lost Order by Steve Berry is a perilous adventure into our country’s dark past, and a potentially even darker future.
The book is rated 4.15/5 at goodreads.com, from 2516 ratings. See 318 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2s0PHSv.
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Google Books preview available in full post.

A crime book recommendation: Cold Earth (Shetland) by Ann Cleeves

A critic review (source Financial Times) can be read at: http://on.ft.com/2s4vM5f.
Few British writers can boast Cleeves’ consummate skill at evoking atmosphere, and the sense of weather and terrain is as crucial to the success of her Shetland novels as the characterisation of Perez, whose Mediterranean ancestry ensures that he is always an outsider in this cloistered community. One of the most memorable entries in the series.
Book description from Google Books:
In the dark days of a Shetland winter, torrential rain triggers a landslide that crosses the main Lerwick-Sumburgh road and sweeps down to the sea. At the burial of his old friend Magnus Tait, Jimmy Perez watches the flood of mud and peaty water smash through a croft house in its path. Everyone thinks the croft is uninhabited, but in the wreckage he finds the body of a dark-haired woman wearing a red silk dress. In his mind, she shares his Mediterranean ancestry and soon he becomes obsessed with tracing her identity. Then it emerges that she was already dead before the landslide hit the house. Perez knows he must find out who she was, and how she died.Also available in the Shetland series are Raven Black, White Nights, Red Bones, Blue Lightning, Dead Water and Thin Air.
The book is rated 4.17/5 at goodreads.com, from 2219 ratings. See 218 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2qLrNGu.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2qL6ghp.