An education-reference book recommendation: William and Dorothy Wordsworth: ‘All in each other’

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2vcJHDO.
A fascinating mix of literary criticism and biography that celebrates sibling love and the nurturing power of the natural world.
Book description from Google Books:
William Wordsworth’s creative collaboration with his ‘beloved Sister’ spanned nearly fifty years, from their first reunion in 1787 until her premature decline in 1835. Rumours of incest have surrounded the siblings since the 19th century, but Lucy Newlyn sees their cohabitation as an expression of deep emotional need, arising from circumstances peculiar to their family history. Born in Cockermouth and parted when Dorothy was six by the death of their mother, the siblings grew up separately and were only reunited four years after their father had died, leaving them destitute. How did their orphaned consciousness shape their understanding of each other? What part did traumatic memories of separation play in their longing for a home? How fully did their re-settlement in the Lake District recompense them for the loss of a shared childhood? Newlyn shows how William and Dorothy’s writings – closely intertwined with their regional affiliations – were part of the lifelong work of jointly re-building their family and re-claiming their communal identity. Walking, talking, remembering, and grieving were as important to their companionship as writing; and at every stage of their adult lives they drew nourishment from their immediate surroundings. This is the first book to bring the full range of Dorothy’s writings into the foreground alongside her brother’s, and to give each sibling the same level of detailed attention. Newlyn explores the symbiotic nature of their creative processes through close reading of journals, letters and poems – sometimes drawing on material that is in manuscript. She uncovers detailed interminglings in their work, approaching these as evidence of their deep affinity. The book offers a spirited rebuttal of the myth that the Romantic writer was a ‘solitary genius’, and that William Wordsworth was a poet of the ‘egotistical sublime’ – arguing instead that he was a poet of community, ‘carrying everywhere with him relationship and love’. Dorothy is not presented as an undervalued or exploited member of the Wordsworth household, but as the poet’s equal in a literary partnership of outstanding importance. Newlyn’s book is deeply researched, drawing on a wide range of recent scholarship – not just in Romantic studies, but in psychology, literary theory, anthropology and life-writing. Yet it is a personal book, written with passion by a scholar-poet and intended to be of some practical use and inspirational value to non-specialist readers. Adopting a holistic approach to mental and spiritual health, human relationships, and the environment, Newlyn provides a timely reminder that creativity thrives best in a gift economy.
The book is rated 4.23/5 at goodreads.com, from 13 ratings. See 3 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uU3Jr7.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uU3mwG.
Google Books preview available in full post.

An education-reference book recommendation: Commonwealth

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2dQTlGH.
Generally speaking, Ann Patchett is a novelist who knows what she’s doing, and to read her is to feel that you’re in good hands. I just wish she’d let those reckless, exhilarated stepsiblings and their irresponsible 1970s parents get away with having fun.
Book description from Google Books:
#1 New York Times BestsellerThe acclaimed, bestselling author—winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize—tells the enthralling story of how an unexpected romantic encounter irrevocably changes two families’ lives.One Sunday afternoon in Southern California, Bert Cousins shows up at Franny Keating’s christening party uninvited. Before evening falls, he has kissed Franny’s mother, Beverly—thus setting in motion the dissolution of their marriages and the joining of two families. Spanning five decades, Commonwealth explores how this chance encounter reverberates through the lives of the four parents and six children involved. Spending summers together in Virginia, the Keating and Cousins children forge a lasting bond that is based on a shared disillusionment with their parents and the strange and genuine affection that grows up between them.When, in her twenties, Franny begins an affair with the legendary author Leon Posen and tells him about her family, the story of her siblings is no longer hers to control. Their childhood becomes the basis for his wildly successful book, ultimately forcing them to come to terms with their losses, their guilt, and the deeply loyal connection they feel for one another.Told with equal measures of humor and heartbreak, Commonwealth is a meditation on inspiration, interpretation, and the ownership of stories. It is a brilliant and tender tale of the far-reaching ties of love and responsibility that bind us together.
The book is rated 3.84/5 at goodreads.com, from 73286 ratings. See 8273 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2eLZhOX.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2skl4Es.

An education-reference book recommendation: London: The Information Capital: 100 Maps and Graphics That Will Change How You View the City

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2uIhOD4.
Cheshire is a geographer; Uberti a designer. Together they have managed to create something that I hesitate to call mindblowing, but it is certainly mind-expanding.
Book description from Google Books:
The British Cartographic Society WINNER The BCS Award 2015 WINNER The Stanfords Award for Printed Mapping 2015 WINNER John C Bartholomew Award for Thematic Mapping 2015 In London: The Information Capital, geographer James Cheshire and designer Oliver Uberti join forces to bring you a series of new maps and graphics charting life in London like never before When do police helicopters catch criminals? Which borough of London is the happiest? Is ‘czesc’ becoming a more common greeting than ‘salaam’? James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti could tell you, but they’d rather show you. By combining millions of data points with stunning design, they investigate how flights stack over Heathrow, who lives longest, and where Londoners love to tweet. The result? One hundred portraits of an old city in a very new way. Dr James Cheshire is a geographer with a passion for London and its data. His award-winning maps draw from his research as a lecturer at University College London and have appeared in the Guardian and the Financial Times, as well as on his popular blog, mappinglondon.co.uk. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. Oliver Uberti is a visual journalist, designer, and the recipient of many awards for his information graphics and art direction. From 2003 to 2012, he worked in the design department of National Geographic, most recently as Senior Design Editor. He has a design studio in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
The book is rated 4.56/5 at goodreads.com, from 90 ratings. See 11 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uI3zOA.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uIz3Eo.

An education-reference book recommendation: William and Dorothy Wordsworth: ‘All in each other’

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2vcJHDO.
A fascinating mix of literary criticism and biography that celebrates sibling love and the nurturing power of the natural world.
Book description from Google Books:
William Wordsworth’s creative collaboration with his ‘beloved Sister’ spanned nearly fifty years, from their first reunion in 1787 until her premature decline in 1835. Rumours of incest have surrounded the siblings since the 19th century, but Lucy Newlyn sees their cohabitation as an expression of deep emotional need, arising from circumstances peculiar to their family history. Born in Cockermouth and parted when Dorothy was six by the death of their mother, the siblings grew up separately and were only reunited four years after their father had died, leaving them destitute. How did their orphaned consciousness shape their understanding of each other? What part did traumatic memories of separation play in their longing for a home? How fully did their re-settlement in the Lake District recompense them for the loss of a shared childhood? Newlyn shows how William and Dorothy’s writings – closely intertwined with their regional affiliations – were part of the lifelong work of jointly re-building their family and re-claiming their communal identity. Walking, talking, remembering, and grieving were as important to their companionship as writing; and at every stage of their adult lives they drew nourishment from their immediate surroundings. This is the first book to bring the full range of Dorothy’s writings into the foreground alongside her brother’s, and to give each sibling the same level of detailed attention. Newlyn explores the symbiotic nature of their creative processes through close reading of journals, letters and poems – sometimes drawing on material that is in manuscript. She uncovers detailed interminglings in their work, approaching these as evidence of their deep affinity. The book offers a spirited rebuttal of the myth that the Romantic writer was a ‘solitary genius’, and that William Wordsworth was a poet of the ‘egotistical sublime’ – arguing instead that he was a poet of community, ‘carrying everywhere with him relationship and love’. Dorothy is not presented as an undervalued or exploited member of the Wordsworth household, but as the poet’s equal in a literary partnership of outstanding importance. Newlyn’s book is deeply researched, drawing on a wide range of recent scholarship – not just in Romantic studies, but in psychology, literary theory, anthropology and life-writing. Yet it is a personal book, written with passion by a scholar-poet and intended to be of some practical use and inspirational value to non-specialist readers. Adopting a holistic approach to mental and spiritual health, human relationships, and the environment, Newlyn provides a timely reminder that creativity thrives best in a gift economy.
The book is rated 4.23/5 at goodreads.com, from 13 ratings. See 3 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uU3Jr7.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uU3mwG.
Google Books preview available in full post.

An education-reference book recommendation: Leave Me: A Novel

A critic review (source Star Tribune) can be read at: http://strib.mn/2f1aWJ7.
…as in every fairy tale, she taps into people’s fears and dreams, and she imparts a little wisdom along the way.
Book description from Google Books:
A #1 September LibraryReads Selection A September Indie Next Pick An Amazon Best Book of the Month A People Pick Every woman who has ever fantasized about driving past her exit on the highway instead of going home to make dinner, and every woman who has ever dreamed of boarding a train to a place where no one needs constant attention–meet Maribeth Klein. A harried working mother who’s so busy taking care of her husband and twins, she doesn’t even realize she’s had a heart attack. Surprised to discover that her recuperation seems to be an imposition on those who rely on her, Maribeth does the unthinkable: she packs a bag and leaves. But, as is often the case, once we get where we’re going we see our lives from a different perspective. Far from the demands of family and career and with the help of liberating new friendships, Maribeth is able to own up to secrets she has been keeping from herself and those she loves. With bighearted characters–husbands, wives, friends, and lovers–who stumble and trip, grow and forgive, Leave Me is about facing the fears we’re all running from. Gayle Forman is a dazzling observer of human nature. She has written an irresistible novel that confronts the ambivalence of modern motherhood head on and asks, what happens when a grown woman runs away from home?  
The book is rated 3.65/5 at goodreads.com, from 10383 ratings. See 1693 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ghyqyV.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sj9N7r.

An education-reference book recommendation: Taste & Technique: Recipes to Elevate Your Home Cooking

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2uAXzfm.
“Taste & Technique” is doably aspirational: While the recipes are unabashedly complex, working through them with patience and persistence will indeed make you a better cook…
Book description from Google Books:
James Beard Award-winning and self-made chef Naomi Pomeroy’s debut cookbook, featuring nearly 140 lesson-driven recipes designed to improve the home cook’s understanding of professional techniques and flavor combinations in order to produce simple, but show-stopping meals. Naomi Pomeroy knows that the best recipes are the ones that make you a better cook. A twenty-year veteran chef with four restaurants to her name, she learned her trade not in fancy culinary schools but by reading cookbooks. From Madeleine Kamman and Charlie Trotter to Alice Waters and Gray Kunz, Naomi cooked her way through the classics, studying French technique, learning how to shop for produce, and mastering balance, acidity, and seasoning.   In Taste & Technique, Naomi shares her hard-won knowledge, passion, and experience along with nearly 140 recipes that outline the fundamentals of cooking. By paring back complex dishes to the building-block techniques used to create them, Naomi takes you through each recipe step by step, distilling detailed culinary information to reveal the simple methods chefs use to get professional results.   Recipes for sauces, starters, salads, vegetables, and desserts can be mixed and matched with poultry, beef, lamb, seafood, and egg dishes to create show-stopping meals all year round. Practice braising and searing with a Milk-Braised Pork Shoulder, then pair it with Orange-Caraway Glazed Carrots in the springtime or Caramelized Delicata Squash in the winter. Prepare an impressive Herbed Leg of Lamb for a holiday gathering, and accompany it with Spring Pea Risotto or Blistered Cauliflower with Anchovy, Garlic, and Chile Flakes.   With detailed sections on ingredients, equipment, and techniques, this inspiring, beautifully photographed guide demystifies the hows and whys of cooking and gives you the confidence and know-how to become a masterful cook.
The book is rated 4.09/5 at goodreads.com, from 94 ratings. See 25 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uTMfq8.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uADvKn.

An education-reference book recommendation: A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age

A critic review (source The Economist) can be read at: http://econ.st/2uRbvx8.
…if everyone could adopt the level of healthy statistical scepticism that Mr Levitin would like, political debate would be in much better shape. This book is an indispensable trainer.
Book description from Google Books:
From The New York Times bestselling author of The Organized Mind and This is Your Brain on Music, a primer to the critical thinking that is more necessary now than ever. We are bombarded with more information each day than our brains can process–especially in election season. It’s raining bad data, half-truths, and even outright lies. New York Times bestselling author Daniel J. Levitin shows how to recognize misleading announcements, statistics, graphs, and written reports revealing the ways lying weasels can use them. It’s becoming harder to separate the wheat from the digital chaff. How do we distinguish misinformation, pseudo-facts, distortions, and outright lies from reliable information? Levitin groups his field guide into two categories–statistical infomation and faulty arguments–ultimately showing how science is the bedrock of critical thinking. Infoliteracy means understanding that there are hierarchies of source quality and bias that variously distort our information feeds via every media channel, including social media. We may expect newspapers, bloggers, the government, and Wikipedia to be factually and logically correct, but they so often aren’t. We need to think critically about the words and numbers we encounter if we want to be successful at work, at play, and in making the most of our lives. This means checking the plausibility and reasoning–not passively accepting information, repeating it, and making decisions based on it. Readers learn to avoid the extremes of passive gullibility and cynical rejection. Levitin’s charming, entertaining, accessible guide can help anyone wake up to a whole lot of things that aren’t so. And catch some lying weasels in their tracks!  
The book is rated 3.76/5 at goodreads.com, from 1236 ratings. See 234 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uzpmgc.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uyW1mp.

An education-reference book recommendation: Night Flight (Harbrace Paperbound Library, Hpl63)

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dQnqGm.
This, then, is The Little Prince for grownups: a story about what one makes of an immense solitude (very well translated by David Carter; and the cover of the book is beautifully conceived), written by a remarkable man…
Book description from Google Books:
In this gripping novel, Saint-Exupéry tells about the brave men who piloted night mail planes from Patagonia, Chile, and Paraguay to Argentina in the early days of commercial aviation. Preface by André Gide. Translated by Stuart Gilbert.
The book is rated 3.79/5 at goodreads.com, from 4919 ratings. See 315 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2eLpz3I.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sby9ja.
Google Books preview available in full post.

An education-reference book recommendation: The Word Detective: Searching for the Meaning of It All at the Oxford English Dictionary

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2uWIEHS.
…this isn’t a book for collectors of lexical trivia. Instead it’s a sustained and sincere reflection on what it means to make a dictionary – the toil, the puzzles, the costs and the profits.
Book description from Google Books:
The former chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary describes his thirty-seven-year journey through words, enlivened by entertaining and erudite
The book is rated 3.88/5 at goodreads.com, from 174 ratings. See 45 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2uDAKHV.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2uVY9j7.

An education-reference book recommendation: Night Flight (Harbrace Paperbound Library, Hpl63)

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dQnqGm.
This, then, is The Little Prince for grownups: a story about what one makes of an immense solitude (very well translated by David Carter; and the cover of the book is beautifully conceived), written by a remarkable man…
Book description from Google Books:
In this gripping novel, Saint-Exupéry tells about the brave men who piloted night mail planes from Patagonia, Chile, and Paraguay to Argentina in the early days of commercial aviation. Preface by André Gide. Translated by Stuart Gilbert.
The book is rated 3.79/5 at goodreads.com, from 4914 ratings. See 314 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2eLpz3I.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: .
Google Books preview available in full post.