A gay-lesbian book recommendation: In the Darkroom by Susan Faludi

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2cCc2gs.
Penetrating and lucid as it is, Faludi’s book can’t answer this question. By the end, however, it seems less urgent, because Stefánie’s prickly, particular humanity comes to overshadow concern about categories.
Book description from Google Books:
From the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling author of Backlash, comes In the Darkroom, an astonishing confrontation with the enigma of her father and the larger riddle of identity consuming our age.“In the summer of 2004 I set out to investigate someone I scarcely knew, my father. The project began with a grievance, the grievance of a daughter whose parent had absconded from her life. I was in pursuit of a scofflaw, an artful dodger who had skipped out on so many things—obligation, affection, culpability, contrition. I was preparing an indictment, amassing discovery for a trial. But somewhere along the line, the prosecutor became a witness.” So begins Susan Faludi’s extraordinary inquiry into the meaning of identity in the modern world and in her own haunted family saga. When the feminist writer learned that her 76-year-old father—long estranged and living in Hungary—had undergone sex reassignment surgery, that investigation would turn personal and urgent. How was this new parent who identified as “a complete woman now” connected to the silent, explosive, and ultimately violent father she had known, the photographer who’d built his career on the alteration of images? Faludi chases that mystery into the recesses of her suburban childhood and her father’s many previous incarnations: American dad, Alpine mountaineer, swashbuckling adventurer in the Amazon outback, Jewish fugitive in Holocaust Budapest. When the author travels to Hungary to reunite with her father, she drops into a labyrinth of dark histories and dangerous politics in a country hell-bent on repressing its past and constructing a fanciful—and virulent—nationhood. The search for identity that has transfixed our century was proving as treacherous for nations as for individuals. Faludi’s struggle to come to grips with her father’s metamorphosis self takes her across borders—historical, political, religious, sexual–to bring her face to face with the question of the age: Is identity something you “choose,” or is it the very thing you can’t escape?
The book is rated 3.96/5 at goodreads.com, from 1569 ratings. See 292 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2awuovk.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tRDWe5.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: A Gentleman’s Position (Society of Gentlemen) by K.J. Charles

A critic review (source All About Romance) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1OAUqew.
I have no hesitation in recommending this work to lovers of romance and historical novels. A Gentleman’s Position is a definite ‘Desert Isle Keeper’.
Book description from Google Books:
Power, privilege, and the rigid rules of class leave two hearts yearning for connection in the sizzling new Society of Gentlemen novel from K. J. Charles.   Among his eccentric though strictly principled group of friends, Lord Richard Vane is the confidant on whom everyone depends for advice, moral rectitude, and discreet assistance. Yet when Richard has a problem, he turns to his valet, a fixer of unparalleled genius—and the object of Richard’s deepest desires. If there is one rule a gentleman must follow, it is never to dally with servants. But when David is close enough to touch, the rules of class collide with the basest sort of animal instinct: overpowering lust.   For David Cyprian, burglary and blackmail are as much in a day’s work as bootblacking—anything for the man he’s devoted to. But the one thing he wants for himself is the one thing Richard refuses to give: his heart. With the tension between them growing to be unbearable, David’s seemingly incorruptible master has left him no choice. Putting his finely honed skills of seduction and manipulation to good use, he will convince Richard to forget all about his well-meaning objections and give in to sweet, sinful temptation.Praise for A Gentleman’s Position  “Highly recommend this one—a great, angst-filled romance.”—Smexy Books   “I can’t recommend A Gentleman’s Position and the rest of the Society books enough!”—Just Love   “I have absolutely loved this series and I found this to be a very satisfying conclusion. . . . I love the way things ended up for Richard and Cyprian and I was thrilled to get their story.”—Joyfully Jay   “Brilliant writing and storytelling! Highly recommend!”—Gay Book Reviews “This book is swoon material—grab it!”—Red Adept Reviews   “What I enjoyed most about this book was the author’s slow and deliberate reveal of the story from both parties’ perspectives.”—The Oddness of Moving Things   “I absolutely loved this book. It was well written, it kept me engaged all the way throughout, and it was so good that I one-clicked the others in the series without even looking at the blurbs. I can safely say that this is one author that I will be reading more of in the future. If you love Regency era-romance and books that really tug on your heart, this is definitely one to check out.”—Inked Rainbow Reads   “This book was so hot and sensual. I know that I will come back to these gentlemen over and over again. I could go on for pages and probably not make much more sense. This book gave me the most exquisite book hangover and I loved every single second of reading and remembering it.”—Watch & Word Society   Praise for the Society of Gentlemen novels   “The Regency period gets more rakish than ever in the Society of Gentlemen series. I’ll read anything K. J. Charles writes!”—New York Times bestselling author Kate Pearce   “K. J. Charles has long been one of my favorite authors.”—USA Today bestselling author Carole Mortimer   “Charles has built a reputation for tight, enthralling plots.”—Publishers Weekly   Includes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.
The book is rated 4.30/5 at goodreads.com, from 1834 ratings. See 435 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1OAUiM6.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2szL4ff.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: Triad Blood by Nathan Burgoine

A critic review (source Dear Author) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2bwyEvM.
I would recommend this book without hesitation if you enjoy a paranormal magical adventure with a gay romantic storyline and some low key social commentary.
Book description from Google Books:
The law of three is unbroken: three vampires form a coterie, three demons make a pack, and three wizards are a coven. That is how it has always been, and how it was always to be. But Luc, Anders, and Curtis-vampire, demon, and wizard-have cheated tradition. Their bond is not coterie, pack, or coven, but something else. Thrust into the supernatural politics ruling Ottawa from behind the shadows, they face Renard, a powerful vampire who harbors deadly secrets of his own and wishes to end their threat. The enemy they know conjures fire and death at every turn. The enemies they don’t know are worse. Blood, soul, and magic gave them freedom. Now they need to survive it.
The book is rated 4.16/5 at goodreads.com, from 123 ratings. See 50 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2bwyunY.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2shOa7j.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: Fast Connection (Cyberlove) (Volume 2) by Megan Erickson

A critic review (source Dear Author) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dNaLDQ.
Loving parents will frequently be protective to the point of being overprotective of their kids against the world even if they do not need much protection. I am deliberately speaking in generalities because I do not want to spoil the book for you. I really enjoyed the book and have already reread it twice, which to me signifies a memorable read.
Book description from Google Books:
After a decade of serving in the Army, everyone still expects me to be Dominic ‘Nicky’ Costigan–the skirt-chasing player. They don’t know I’ve been spending my days trying to figure out my post-military life. Including how to pick up guys. When I meet Luke on a hookup app, he makes it clear it’s for one-night only. That’s fine with me, because I’m down to see what this silver fox can do. But after I arrive at his doorstep, it doesn’t take long to realize we have serious chemistry, and we end up meeting again. He’s got more walls around his heart than a military base, but I think he’s as addicted to me as I am to him. He can’t resist me for long. I mean, who can? Except Luke’s rules exist for a reason, and when I test his limits, things get complicated. Maybe too complicated. *FAST CONNECTION is a standalone, full-length romance novel with no cliffhanger*
The book is rated 4.36/5 at goodreads.com, from 3332 ratings. See 721 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2eHT8D1.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tI4GS8.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: Broken by Nicola Haken

A critic review (source All About Romance) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1tlmxdZ.
Nicola Haken has either personal experience of this form of mental illness or has done some wonderful research. The writing is truthful, although as I said, it’s not an easy read; but you want these characters to be together so much.
Book description from Google Books:
When Theodore Davenport decides to switch his mundane job for a career, he walks into Holden House Publishing with enthusiasm and determination to succeed. As he settles into his new role, makes new friends, and dreams of making it to the top, everything is going to plan. Until he meets James Holden, CEO of Holden House. James Holden hasn’t been able to stop thinking about his encounter with the timid man he met in a club bathroom last week, and when he discovers the one haunting his dreams is an employee, he can’t seem to stop himself from pursuing him. Just a little fun – that’s what James tells himself. He can’t afford to care for someone who can never reciprocate, not once they find out who he really is. James believes nobody deserves the burden of being attached to him. He’s a complicated man. Damaged. Difficult. Demanding. Broken. Is Theodore strong enough to confront James’ demons? More importantly, is James? (M/M romance. Not suitable for readers under 18 years of age due to language and sexual content. ***Please note*** This book contains scenes of self harm, mental illness and suicidal ideation which may be uncomfortable for some readers.)
The book is rated 4.32/5 at goodreads.com, from 3451 ratings. See 671 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1tlm4si.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2t3s74S.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: Sunset Park by Santino Hassell

A critic review (source Dear Author) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2bpBbuk.
Since Raymond and David narrate the book in turns it is obvious to the reader that they love each other quite early in the book, but it was still a delight to watch how they navigate all the complications and often self-imposed obstacles as they move closer and closer to each other.
Book description from Google Books:
A Five Boroughs Story Raymond Rodriguez’s days of shoving responsibility to the wayside are over. His older brother wants to live with his boyfriend, so Raymond has to get his act together and find a place of his own. But when out-and-proud David Butler offers to be his roommate, Raymond agrees for reasons other than needing a place to crash. David is Raymond’s opposite in almost every way–he’s Connecticut prim and proper while Raymond is a sarcastic longshoreman from Queens–but their friendship is solid. Their closeness surprises everyone as does their not-so-playful flirtation, since Raymond has always kept his bicurious side a secret. Once they’re under the same roof, flirting turns physical, and soon their easy camaraderie is in danger of being lost to frustrating sexual tension and the stark cultural differences that set them apart. Now Raymond not only has to commit to his new independence–he has to commit to his feelings for David or risk losing him for good.
The book is rated 4.18/5 at goodreads.com, from 2891 ratings. See 583 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2bpgXOF.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2t3nx6o.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: Draw the Line by Laurent Linn

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2akkRr2.
But in its powerful visual components, “Draw the Line” pushes Adrian’s story into bold new territory. The art — images from Graphite’s adventures, discarded sketches — is appropriately inconsistent.
Book description from Google Books:
After a hate crime occurs in his small Texas town, Adrian Piper must discover his own power, decide how to use it, and know where to draw the line in this stunning debut novel exquisitely illustrated by the author.Adrian Piper is used to blending into the background. He may be a talented artist, a sci-fi geek, and gay, but at his Texas high school those traits would only bring him the worst kind of attention. In fact, the only place he feels free to express himself is at his drawing table, crafting a secret world through his own Renaissance-art-inspired superhero, Graphite. But in real life, when a shocking hate crime flips his world upside down, Adrian must decide what kind of person he wants to be. Maybe it’s time to not be so invisible after all—no matter how dangerous the risk.
The book is rated 3.89/5 at goodreads.com, from 634 ratings. See 161 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2alet61.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sSpt1A.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was: A Novel by Sjón

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/25Xg6ih.
Though it is a deeply felt novel, Sjón’s prose is never histrionic or overwrought, balancing rage and hallucination (there are echoes of Artaud and Ballard) with a gentleness of spirit, an affection for precision and the small scale. The result is sure to delight his fans and convert many new ones.
Book description from Google Books:
The mind-bending miniature historical epic is Sjón’s specialty, and Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was is no exception. But it is also Sjón’s most realistic, accessible, and heartfelt work yet. It is the story of a young man on the fringes of a society that is itself at the fringes of the world–at what seems like history’s most tumultuous, perhaps ultimate moment. Máni Steinn is queer in a society in which the idea of homosexuality is beyond the furthest extreme. His city, Reykjavik in 1918, is homogeneous and isolated and seems entirely defenseless against the Spanish flu, which has already torn through Europe, Asia, and North America and is now lapping up on Iceland’s shores. And if the flu doesn’t do it, there’s always the threat that war will spread all the way north. And yet the outside world has also brought Icelanders cinema! And there’s nothing like a dark, silent room with a film from Europe flickering on the screen to help you escape from the overwhelming threats–and adventures–of the night, to transport you, to make you feel like everything is going to be all right. For Máni Steinn, the question is whether, at Reykjavik’s darkest hour, he should retreat all the way into this imaginary world, or if he should engage with the society that has so soundly rejected him.
The book is rated 3.71/5 at goodreads.com, from 1301 ratings. See 236 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/25XgbTc.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sTFjZJ.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: The Rope Swing: Stories by Jonathan Corcoran

A critic review (source Star Tribune) can be read at: http://strib.mn/2exVXGU.
Given the recent tragedy in Orlando, the story ends with an especially timely appeal for understanding among humans. These artful stories of loss and longing are difficult to put down.
Book description from Google Books:
A once-booming West Virginia rail town no longer has a working train. The residents left behind in this tiny hamlet look to the mountains that surround them on all sides: The outside world encroaches, and the buildings of the gilded past seem to crumble more every day.  These are the stories of outsiders–the down and out. What happens to the young boy whose burgeoning sexuality pushes him to the edge of the forest to explore what might be love with another boy? What happens when one lost soul finally makes it to New York City, yet the reminders of his past life are omnipresent? What happens when an old woman struggles to find a purpose and reinvent herself after decades of living in the shadow of her platonic life partner? What happens to those who dare to live their lives outside of the strict confines of the town’s traditional and regimented ways?  The characters in The Rope Swing–gay and straight alike–yearn for that which seems so close but impossibly far, the world over the jagged peaks of the mountains. 
The book is rated 4.38/5 at goodreads.com, from 60 ratings. See 18 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dEaALm.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sJfLyq.

A gay-lesbian book recommendation: A Gentleman’s Position (Society of Gentlemen) by K.J. Charles

A critic review (source All About Romance) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1OAUqew.
I have no hesitation in recommending this work to lovers of romance and historical novels. A Gentleman’s Position is a definite ‘Desert Isle Keeper’.
Book description from Google Books:
Power, privilege, and the rigid rules of class leave two hearts yearning for connection in the sizzling new Society of Gentlemen novel from K. J. Charles.   Among his eccentric though strictly principled group of friends, Lord Richard Vane is the confidant on whom everyone depends for advice, moral rectitude, and discreet assistance. Yet when Richard has a problem, he turns to his valet, a fixer of unparalleled genius—and the object of Richard’s deepest desires. If there is one rule a gentleman must follow, it is never to dally with servants. But when David is close enough to touch, the rules of class collide with the basest sort of animal instinct: overpowering lust.   For David Cyprian, burglary and blackmail are as much in a day’s work as bootblacking—anything for the man he’s devoted to. But the one thing he wants for himself is the one thing Richard refuses to give: his heart. With the tension between them growing to be unbearable, David’s seemingly incorruptible master has left him no choice. Putting his finely honed skills of seduction and manipulation to good use, he will convince Richard to forget all about his well-meaning objections and give in to sweet, sinful temptation.Praise for A Gentleman’s Position  “Highly recommend this one—a great, angst-filled romance.”—Smexy Books   “I can’t recommend A Gentleman’s Position and the rest of the Society books enough!”—Just Love   “I have absolutely loved this series and I found this to be a very satisfying conclusion. . . . I love the way things ended up for Richard and Cyprian and I was thrilled to get their story.”—Joyfully Jay   “Brilliant writing and storytelling! Highly recommend!”—Gay Book Reviews “This book is swoon material—grab it!”—Red Adept Reviews   “What I enjoyed most about this book was the author’s slow and deliberate reveal of the story from both parties’ perspectives.”—The Oddness of Moving Things   “I absolutely loved this book. It was well written, it kept me engaged all the way throughout, and it was so good that I one-clicked the others in the series without even looking at the blurbs. I can safely say that this is one author that I will be reading more of in the future. If you love Regency era-romance and books that really tug on your heart, this is definitely one to check out.”—Inked Rainbow Reads   “This book was so hot and sensual. I know that I will come back to these gentlemen over and over again. I could go on for pages and probably not make much more sense. This book gave me the most exquisite book hangover and I loved every single second of reading and remembering it.”—Watch & Word Society   Praise for the Society of Gentlemen novels   “The Regency period gets more rakish than ever in the Society of Gentlemen series. I’ll read anything K. J. Charles writes!”—New York Times bestselling author Kate Pearce   “K. J. Charles has long been one of my favorite authors.”—USA Today bestselling author Carole Mortimer   “Charles has built a reputation for tight, enthralling plots.”—Publishers Weekly   Includes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.
The book is rated 4.30/5 at goodreads.com, from 1813 ratings. See 432 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1OAUiM6.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2szL4ff.
Google Books preview available in full post.