A horror book recommendation: A Thousand Paper Birds by Tor Udall

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2Djo9tr.
Heartbreaking and uplifting in equal measure, it’s a love letter to a garden and a paean to all kinds of imperfect love.
Book description from Google Books:
After the sudden death of his wife, Audrey, Jonah sits on a bench in Kew Gardens, trying to reassemble the shattered pieces of his life. Chloe, shaven-headed and abrasive, finds solace in the origami she meticulously folds. But when she meets Jonah, her carefully constructed defences threaten to fall. Milly, a child quick to laugh, freely roams Kew, finding beauty everywhere she goes. But where is her mother and where does she go when the gardens are closed? Harry’s purpose is to save plants from extinction. Quiet and enigmatic, he longs for something- or someone- who will root him more firmly to the earth. Audrey links these strangers together. As the mystery of her death unravels, the characters journey through the seasons to learn that stories, like paper, can be refolded and reformed.
The book is rated 4.05/5 at goodreads.com, from 144 ratings. See 43 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C8RVBG.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2CbT6QX.

A horror book recommendation: A Thousand Paper Birds by Tor Udall

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2Djo9tr.
Heartbreaking and uplifting in equal measure, it’s a love letter to a garden and a paean to all kinds of imperfect love.
Book description from Google Books:
After the sudden death of his wife, Audrey, Jonah sits on a bench in Kew Gardens, trying to reassemble the shattered pieces of his life. Chloe, shaven-headed and abrasive, finds solace in the origami she meticulously folds. But when she meets Jonah, her carefully constructed defences threaten to fall. Milly, a child quick to laugh, freely roams Kew, finding beauty everywhere she goes. But where is her mother and where does she go when the gardens are closed? Harry’s purpose is to save plants from extinction. Quiet and enigmatic, he longs for something- or someone- who will root him more firmly to the earth. Audrey links these strangers together. As the mystery of her death unravels, the characters journey through the seasons to learn that stories, like paper, can be refolded and reformed.
The book is rated 4.05/5 at goodreads.com, from 142 ratings. See 43 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C8RVBG.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2CbT6QX.

A horror book recommendation: Meddling Kids: A Novel (A Blyton Summer Detective Club Adventure) by Edgar Cantero

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2D6ydG9.
So yes, Meddling Kids is a story about what happened to the Scooby Doo gang after they all grew up. And it is awesome. It is a book that lives completely in the sweet recollections of childhood summers
Book description from Google Books:
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “Freaky pleasure…it scratches a nostalgic itch for those who grew up on Saturday morning Scooby-Doo cartoons and sugar-bombed breakfast cereal” –USA Today “Deliriously wild, funny and imaginative. Cantero is an original voice.” –Charles Yu, author of How to Live in a Science Fictional Universe With raucous humor and brilliantly orchestrated mayhem, Meddling Kids subverts teen detective archetypes like the Hardy Boys, the Famous Five, and Scooby-Doo, and delivers an exuberant and wickedly entertaining celebration of horror, love, friendship, and many-tentacled, interdimensional demon spawn. SUMMER 1977. The Blyton Summer Detective Club (of Blyton Hills, a small mining town in Oregon’s Zoinx River Valley) solved their final mystery and unmasked the elusive Sleepy Lake monster–another low-life fortune hunter trying to get his dirty hands on the legendary riches hidden in Debo�n Mansion. And he would have gotten away with it too, if it weren’t for those meddling kids. 1990. The former detectives have grown up and apart, each haunted by disturbing memories of their final night in the old haunted house. There are too many strange, half-remembered encounters and events that cannot be dismissed or explained away by a guy in a mask. And Andy, the once intrepid tomboy now wanted in two states, is tired of running from her demons. She needs answers. To find them she will need Kerri, the one-time kid genius and budding biologist, now drinking her ghosts away in New York with Tim, an excitable Weimaraner descended from the original canine member of the club. They will also have to get Nate, the horror nerd currently residing in an asylum in Arkham, Massachusetts. Luckily Nate has not lost contact with Peter, the handsome jock turned movie star who was once their team leader . . . which is remarkable, considering Peter has been dead for years. The time has come to get the team back together, face their fears, and find out what actually happened all those years ago at Sleepy Lake. It’s their only chance to end the nightmares and, perhaps, save the world. A nostalgic and subversive trip rife with sly nods to H. P. Lovecraft and pop culture, Edgar Cantero’s Meddling Kids is a strikingly original and dazzling reminder of the fun and adventure we can discover at the heart of our favorite stories, no matter how old we get.
The book is rated 3.62/5 at goodreads.com, from 4861 ratings. See 1132 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D4haV3.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D5e8zY.

A horror book recommendation: The Rules of Magic: A Novel by Alice Hoffman

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2BU8FfY.
Sometimes the degree to which I know Practical Magic by heart worked against my enjoyment, as Rules of Magic contradicts or rewrites elements of the former in order to fully develop the aunts’ lives…But overall, the tug of the familiar and the enchantment of the new are the rule to which the above were exceptions.
Book description from Google Books:
**INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER** **REESE WITHERSPOON BOOK CLUB PICK** From beloved author Alice Hoffman comes the spellbinding prequel to her bestseller, Practical Magic.Find your magic. For the Owens family, love is a curse that began in 1620, when Maria Owens was charged with witchery for loving the wrong man. Hundreds of years later, in New York City at the cusp of the sixties, when the whole world is about to change, Susanna Owens knows that her three children are dangerously unique. Difficult Franny, with skin as pale as milk and blood red hair, shy and beautiful Jet, who can read other people’s thoughts, and charismatic Vincent, who began looking for trouble on the day he could walk. From the start Susanna sets down rules for her children: No walking in the moonlight, no red shoes, no wearing black, no cats, no crows, no candles, no books about magic. And most importantly, never, ever, fall in love. But when her children visit their Aunt Isabelle, in the small Massachusetts town where the Owens family has been blamed for everything that has ever gone wrong, they uncover family secrets and begin to understand the truth of who they are. Back in New York City each begins a risky journey as they try to escape the family curse. The Owens children cannot escape love even if they try, just as they cannot escape the pains of the human heart. The two beautiful sisters will grow up to be the revered, and sometimes feared, aunts in Practical Magic, while Vincent, their beloved brother, will leave an unexpected legacy. Thrilling and exquisite, real and fantastical, The Rules of Magic is a story about the power of love reminding us that the only remedy for being human is to be true to yourself.
The book is rated 4.07/5 at goodreads.com, from 10157 ratings. See 1769 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BW7ahu.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D1QMLL.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A horror book recommendation: Meddling Kids: A Novel (A Blyton Summer Detective Club Adventure) by Edgar Cantero

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2D6ydG9.
So yes, Meddling Kids is a story about what happened to the Scooby Doo gang after they all grew up. And it is awesome. It is a book that lives completely in the sweet recollections of childhood summers
Book description from Google Books:
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “Freaky pleasure…it scratches a nostalgic itch for those who grew up on Saturday morning Scooby-Doo cartoons and sugar-bombed breakfast cereal” –USA Today “Deliriously wild, funny and imaginative. Cantero is an original voice.” –Charles Yu, author of How to Live in a Science Fictional Universe With raucous humor and brilliantly orchestrated mayhem, Meddling Kids subverts teen detective archetypes like the Hardy Boys, the Famous Five, and Scooby-Doo, and delivers an exuberant and wickedly entertaining celebration of horror, love, friendship, and many-tentacled, interdimensional demon spawn. SUMMER 1977. The Blyton Summer Detective Club (of Blyton Hills, a small mining town in Oregon’s Zoinx River Valley) solved their final mystery and unmasked the elusive Sleepy Lake monster–another low-life fortune hunter trying to get his dirty hands on the legendary riches hidden in Debo�n Mansion. And he would have gotten away with it too, if it weren’t for those meddling kids. 1990. The former detectives have grown up and apart, each haunted by disturbing memories of their final night in the old haunted house. There are too many strange, half-remembered encounters and events that cannot be dismissed or explained away by a guy in a mask. And Andy, the once intrepid tomboy now wanted in two states, is tired of running from her demons. She needs answers. To find them she will need Kerri, the one-time kid genius and budding biologist, now drinking her ghosts away in New York with Tim, an excitable Weimaraner descended from the original canine member of the club. They will also have to get Nate, the horror nerd currently residing in an asylum in Arkham, Massachusetts. Luckily Nate has not lost contact with Peter, the handsome jock turned movie star who was once their team leader . . . which is remarkable, considering Peter has been dead for years. The time has come to get the team back together, face their fears, and find out what actually happened all those years ago at Sleepy Lake. It’s their only chance to end the nightmares and, perhaps, save the world. A nostalgic and subversive trip rife with sly nods to H. P. Lovecraft and pop culture, Edgar Cantero’s Meddling Kids is a strikingly original and dazzling reminder of the fun and adventure we can discover at the heart of our favorite stories, no matter how old we get.
The book is rated 3.61/5 at goodreads.com, from 4818 ratings. See 1128 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D4haV3.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D5e8zY.

A horror book recommendation: The Changeling: A Novel by Victor LaValle

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2j86o8E.
By turns enchanting, infuriating, horrifying, and heartbreaking, The Changeling is never less than completely engaging.
Book description from Google Books:
“If the literary gods mixed together Haruki Murakami and Ralph Ellison, the result would be Victor LaValle.”—Anthony Doerr, author of All the Light We Cannot See“A dark fairy tale of New York, full of magic and loss, myth and mystery, love and madness. The Changeling is a mesmerizing, monumental work.”—Marlon James, author of A Brief History of Seven KillingsOne of Time’s Top 10 Novels of the Year When Apollo Kagwa’s father disappeared, all he left his son were strange recurring dreams and a box of books stamped with the word IMPROBABILIA. Now Apollo is a father himself—and as he and his wife, Emma, are settling into their new lives as parents, exhaustion and anxiety start to take their toll. Apollo’s old dreams return and Emma begins acting odd. Irritable and disconnected from their new baby boy, at first Emma seems to be exhibiting signs of postpartum depression, but it quickly becomes clear that her troubles go even deeper. Before Apollo can do anything to help, Emma commits a horrific act—beyond any parent’s comprehension—and vanishes, seemingly into thin air. Thus begins Apollo’s odyssey through a world he only thought he understood, to find a wife and child who are nothing like he’d imagined. His quest, which begins when he meets a mysterious stranger who claims to have information about Emma’s whereabouts, takes him to a forgotten island, a graveyard full of secrets, a forest where immigrant legends still live, and finally back to a place he thought he had lost forever. This captivating retelling of a classic fairy tale imaginatively explores parental obsession, spousal love, and the secrets that make strangers out of the people we love the most. It’s a thrilling and emotionally devastating journey through the gruesome legacies that threaten to devour us and the homely, messy magic that saves us, if we’re lucky.“LaValle’s haunting tale weaves a mesmerizing web around fatherhood, racism, horrific anxieties and even To Kill a Mockingbird.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times“Like a woke Brothers Grimm, his clever new spin on the ages-old changeling myth is a modern fairy tale for the Trump era.”—USA Today (four out of four stars)“Victor LaValle’s fabulist ode to fatherhood and fairy tales offers a new take on themes as old as time.”—O: The Oprah Magazine
The book is rated 3.88/5 at goodreads.com, from 2325 ratings. See 467 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BtmW1V.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2j8gw18.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A horror book recommendation: The Changeling: A Novel by Victor LaValle

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2j86o8E.
By turns enchanting, infuriating, horrifying, and heartbreaking, The Changeling is never less than completely engaging.
Book description from Google Books:
“If the literary gods mixed together Haruki Murakami and Ralph Ellison, the result would be Victor LaValle.”—Anthony Doerr, author of All the Light We Cannot See“A dark fairy tale of New York, full of magic and loss, myth and mystery, love and madness. The Changeling is a mesmerizing, monumental work.”—Marlon James, author of A Brief History of Seven KillingsA summer reading pick by The New York Times • O: The Oprah Magazine • Vulture • PopSugar • Publishers Weekly When Apollo Kagwa’s father disappeared, all he left his son were strange recurring dreams and a box of books stamped with the word IMPROBABILIA. Now Apollo is a father himself—and as he and his wife, Emma, are settling into their new lives as parents, exhaustion and anxiety start to take their toll. Apollo’s old dreams return and Emma begins acting odd. Irritable and disconnected from their new baby boy, at first Emma seems to be exhibiting signs of postpartum depression, but it quickly becomes clear that her troubles go even deeper. Before Apollo can do anything to help, Emma commits a horrific act—beyond any parent’s comprehension—and vanishes, seemingly into thin air. Thus begins Apollo’s odyssey through a world he only thought he understood, to find a wife and child who are nothing like he’d imagined. His quest, which begins when he meets a mysterious stranger who claims to have information about Emma’s whereabouts, takes him to a forgotten island, a graveyard full of secrets, a forest where immigrant legends still live, and finally back to a place he thought he had lost forever. This captivating retelling of a classic fairy tale imaginatively explores parental obsession, spousal love, and the secrets that make strangers out of the people we love the most. It’s a thrilling and emotionally devastating journey through the gruesome legacies that threaten to devour us and the homely, messy magic that saves us, if we’re lucky.“LaValle’s haunting tale weaves a mesmerizing web around fatherhood, racism, horrific anxieties and even To Kill a Mockingbird.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times“Like a woke Brothers Grimm, his clever new spin on the ages-old changeling myth is a modern fairy tale for the Trump era.”—USA Today (four out of four stars)“Victor LaValle’s fabulist ode to fatherhood and fairy tales offers a new take on themes as old as time.”—O: The Oprah Magazine
The book is rated 3.88/5 at goodreads.com, from 2289 ratings. See 460 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BtmW1V.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2j8gw18.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A horror book recommendation: To Kill the President: The Most Explosive Thriller of the Year by SAM BOURNE

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2BpNiBV.
If he opened it – and showed more mature reflection than he has on other topics – he would find a pacy, engaging and morally serious thriller that offers no easy answers on the limits of loyalty and dissent within a democracy.
Book description from Google Books:
Maggie Costello uncovers an assassination plot to kill the tyrannical new president. A blockbuster thriller from No.1 Sunday Times bestselling author Sam Bourne. The unthinkable has happened… The United States has elected a volatile demagogue as president, backed by his ruthless chief strategist, Crawford ‘Mac’ McNamara. When a war of words with the North Korean regime spirals out of control and the President comes perilously close to launching a nuclear attack, it’s clear someone has to act, or the world will be reduced to ashes. Soon Maggie Costello, a seasoned Washington operator and stubbornly principled, discovers an inside plot to kill the President – and faces the ultimate moral dilemma. Should she save the President and leave the free world at the mercy of an increasingly crazed would-be tyrant – or commit treason against her Commander in Chief and risk plunging the country into a civil war?
The book is rated 3.84/5 at goodreads.com, from 1194 ratings. See 166 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BpNxwP.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2BoRNg2.

A horror book recommendation: The Heart of What Was Lost (Osten Ard) by Tad Williams

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2AiOyHD.
That Williams has turned this functional little tome into a gem unto itself not only speaks to his enduring talent as a spinner of fantasy, but to the durability of Osten Ard itself — an awesome, immersive realm well worth revisiting all these years later.
Book description from Google Books:
New York Times-bestselling Tad Williams’ ground-breaking epic fantasy saga of Osten Ard begins an exciting new cycle!    The perfect introduction to the epic fantasy world of Osten Ard, The Heart of What Was Lost is Tad Williams’ follow-up to his internationally bestselling landmark trilogy. Osten Ard inspired a generation of modern fantasy writers, including George R.R. Martin, Patrick Rothfuss, and Christopher Paolini, and defined Tad Williams as one of the most important fantasy writers of our time. 



   A NOVEL OF OSTEN ARD  At the end of Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, Ineluki the Storm King, an undead spirit of horrifying, demonic power, came within moments of stopping Time itself and obliterating humankind. He was defeated by a coalition of mortal men and women joined by his own deathless descendants, the Sithi. In the wake of the Storm King’s fall, Ineluki’s loyal minions, the Norns, dark cousins to the Sithi, choose to flee the lands of men and retreat north to Nakkiga, their ancient citadel within the hollow heart of the mountain called Stormspike. But as the defeated Norns make their way to this last haven, the mortal Rimmersman Duke Isgrimnur leads an army in pursuit, determined to end the Norns’ attacks and defeat their ageless Queen Utuk’ku for all time. Two southern soldiers, Porto and Endri, joined the mortal army to help achieve this ambitious goal—though as they venture farther and farther into the frozen north, braving the fierce resistance and deadly magics of the retreating Norns, they cannot help but wonder what they are doing so very far from home. Meanwhile, the Norns must now confront the prospect of extinction at the hands of Isgrimnur and his mortal army. Viyeki, a leader of the Norns’ military engineers, the Order of Builders, desperately seeks a way to help his people reach their mountain—and then stave off the destruction of their race. For the two armies will finally clash in a battle to be remembered as the Siege of Nakkiga; a battle so strange and deadly, so wracked with dark enchantment, that it threatens to destroy not just one side but quite possibly all. Trapped inside the mountain as the mortals batter at Nakkiga’s gates, Viyeki the Builder will discover disturbing secrets about his own people, mysteries both present and past, represented by the priceless gem known as The Heart of What Was Lost.   Praise for Osten Ard:   “Inspired me to write my own seven-book trilogy…. It’s one of my favorite fantasy series.” —George R. R. Martin, New York Times-bestselling author of The Game of Thrones   “Groundbreaking…changed how people thought of the genre, and paved the way for so much modern fantasy. Including mine.” —Patrick Rothfuss, New York Times-bestselling author of The Name of the Wind  “Tad Williams is a master storyteller, and the Osten Ard books are his masterpiece.” —Brandon Sanderson, New York Times-bestselling author of Mistborn“Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn is one of the great fantasy epics of all time.” —Christopher Paolini, New York Times-bestselling author of Eragon
The book is rated 4.03/5 at goodreads.com, from 1191 ratings. See 229 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2zvVq3g.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2zwJ8HI.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A horror book recommendation: The Only Child: A Novel by Andrew Pyper

A critic review (source Toronto Star) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2AiaSkA.
Having skilfully set up the reader for a Hannibal Lecter-style duel between brilliant psychopath and troubled interrogator, Pyper upends genre conventions yet again by having the patient, soon named simply as “Michael,” demonstrate genuine supernatural powers…
Book description from Google Books:
The #1 internationally bestselling author Andrew Pyper returns with a thrilling new novel about one woman’s search for a killer and the stunning secret that binds them to each other.What if you learned your father wasn’t who you thought he was? What if you learned you carried secrets deep within your blood? Dr. Lily Dominick has seen her share of bizarre cases as a forensic psychiatrist working with some of New York’s most dangerous psychotic criminals. But nothing can prepare Lily for her newest patient. Client 46874-A is nameless. He insists that he is not human, and believes that he was not born, but created over two hundred years ago. As Lily listens to this man describe the twisted crime he’s committed, she can’t shake the feeling that he’s come for her—especially once he reveals something she would have thought impossible: He knew her mother. Lily was only six years old when her mother was violently killed in what investigators concluded was a bear attack. But even though she was there, even though she saw it, Lily has never been certain of what really happened that night. Now, this stranger may hold the answers to the questions she’s buried deep within herself all her life. That’s when he escapes. To discover the truth—behind her client, her mother’s death, herself—Lily must embark on a journey to find him that will threaten her career, her sanity, and ultimately her life. Fusing relentless suspense with surprising emotion, The Only Child is a psychological thriller about family, identity and monstrosity that will keep you up until its last unforgettable revelation.
The book is rated 3.17/5 at goodreads.com, from 742 ratings. See 187 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2zwPI0T.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2zyNcHr.
Google Books preview available in full post.