A non-fiction book recommendation: The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish Way to Live Well by Meik Wiking

A critic review (source Financial Times) can be read at: http://on.ft.com/2mVCZPw.
The thickly bound format is ideally read in bed. This is just the kind of book to shut out the world with a sense of Scandinavian comfort.
Book description from Google Books:
The Sunday Times bestseller The New York Times bestseller The Danish word hygge is one of those beautiful words that doesn’t directly translate into English, but it more or less means comfort, warmth or togetherness. Hygge is the feeling you get when you are cuddled up on a sofa with a loved one, in warm knitted socks, in front of the fire, when it is dark, cold and stormy outside. It that feeling when you are sharing good, comfort food with your closest friends, by candle light and exchanging easy conversation. It is those cold, crisp blue sky mornings when the light through your window is just right. Denmark is the happiest nation in the world and Meik puts this largely down to them living the hygge way. They focus on the small things that really matter, spend more quality time with friends and family and enjoy the good things in life. The Little Book of Hygge will give you practical steps and tips to become more hygge: how to pick the right lighting, organise a dinner party and even how to dress hygge, all backed up by Meik’s years’ of research at the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen. This year live more like a Dane, embrace hygge and become happier.
The book is rated 3.73/5 at goodreads.com, from 11425 ratings. See 1377 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2mKHIa1.
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A non-fiction book recommendation: Three Days in January: Dwight Eisenhower’s Final Mission by Bret Baier

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2p1t4LM.
Many have tried to assess Ike. Few succeed. Mr. Baier does, with the inspired selection of the closing event of Ike’s presidency as a touchstone in a passionate search for the diverse, complex and energizing “spirit of Ike.”
Book description from Google Books:
The blockbuster #1 national bestsellerBret Baier, the Chief Political Anchor for Fox News Channel and the Anchor and Executive Editor of Special Report with Bret Baier, illuminates the extraordinary yet underappreciated presidency of Dwight Eisenhower by taking readers into Ike’s last days in power.“Magnificently rendered. … Destined to take its place as not only one of the masterworks on Eisenhower, but as one of the classics of presidential history. … Impeccably researched, the book is nothing short of extraordinary. What a triumph!”—JAY WINIK, New York Times bestselling author of April 1865 and 1944In Three Days in January, Bret Baier masterfully casts the period between Eisenhower’s now-prophetic farewell address on the evening of January 17, 1961, and Kennedy’s inauguration on the afternoon of January 20 as the closing act of one of modern America’s greatest leaders—during which Eisenhower urgently sought to prepare both the country and the next president for the challenges ahead.Those three days in January 1961, Baier shows, were the culmination of a lifetime of service that took Ike from rural Kansas to West Point, to the battlefields of World War II, and finally to the Oval Office. When he left the White House, Dwight Eisenhower had done more than perhaps any other modern American to set the nation, in his words, “on our charted course toward permanent peace and human betterment.”On January 17, Eisenhower spoke to the nation in one of the most remarkable farewell speeches in U.S. history. Ike looked to the future, warning Americans against the dangers of elevating partisanship above national interest, excessive government budgets (particularly deficit spending), the expansion of the military-industrial complex, and the creeping political power of special interests. Seeking to ready a new generation for power, Eisenhower intensely advised the forty-three-year-old Kennedy before the inauguration. Baier also reveals how Eisenhower’s two terms changed America forever for the better, and demonstrates how today Ike offers us the model of principled leadership that polls say is so missing in politics. Three Days in January forever makes clear that Eisenhower, an often forgotten giant of U.S. history, still offers vital lessons for our own time and stands as a lasting example of political leadership at its most effective and honorable.   
The book is rated 4.13/5 at goodreads.com, from 1196 ratings. See 172 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2p1omNW.
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A non-fiction book recommendation: The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse by Tom Verducci

A critic review (source WSJ online) can be read at: http://on.wsj.com/2qKSw6k.
“The Cubs Way” is a lush accounting of one of the most thrilling championship runs in American sports history—by the numbers and by the personalities that made it happen.
Book description from Google Books:
The New York Times BestsellerWith inside access and reporting, Sports Illustrated senior baseball writer and FOX Sports analyst Tom Verducci reveals how Theo Epstein and Joe Maddon built, led, and inspired the Chicago Cubs team that broke the longest championship drought in sports, chronicling their epic journey to become World Series champions. It took 108 years, but it really happened. The Chicago Cubs are once again World Series champions.  How did a team composed of unknown, young players and supposedly washed-up veterans come together to break the Curse of the Billy Goat? Tom Verducci, twice named National Sportswriter of the Year and co-writer of The Yankee Years with Joe Torre, will have full access to team president Theo Epstein, manager Joe Maddon, and the players to tell the story of the Cubs’ transformation from perennial underachievers to the best team in baseball.  Beginning with Epstein’s first year with the team in 2011, Verducci will show how Epstein went beyond “Moneyball” thinking to turn around the franchise. Leading the organization with a manual called “The Cubs Way,” he focused on the mental side of the game as much as the physical, emphasizing chemistry as well as statistics.  To accomplish his goal, Epstein needed manager Joe Maddon, an eccentric innovator, as his counterweight on the Cubs’ bench.  A man who encourages themed road trips and late-arrival game days to loosen up his team, Maddon mixed New Age thinking with Old School leadership to help his players find their edge.   The Cubs Way takes readers behind the scenes, chronicling how key players like Rizzo, Russell, Lester, and Arrieta were deftly brought into the organization by Epstein and coached by Maddon to outperform expectations. Together, Epstein and Maddon proved that clubhouse culture is as important as on-base-percentage, and that intangible components like personality, vibe, and positive energy are necessary for a team to perform to their fullest potential.  Verducci chronicles the playoff run that culminated in an instant classic Game Seven. He takes a broader look at the history of baseball in Chicago and the almost supernatural element to the team’s repeated loses that kept fans suffering, but also served to strengthen their loyalty.   The Cubs Way is a celebration of an iconic team and its journey to a World Championship that fans and readers will cherish for years to come.
The book is rated 4.58/5 at goodreads.com, from 724 ratings. See 121 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2qKArVZ.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2s3UhPG.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A non-fiction book recommendation: Pieces of Soap: Essays by Stanley Elkin

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2mFsWjy.
There’s a tendency to approach a posthumous collection of work by an esteemed “writer’s writer” with respectful courtesy, but Stanley Elkin’s essays demand a rowdier response from readers. They’re weird and spirited, full of literal piss and vinegar.
Book description from Google Books:
These incisive, utterly unique pieces swoop and soar from Hollywood to Fifth Avenue, from show biz to high literature, from first sex to the First Amendment, attacking America’s absurdities with an informed sense of the serious. Elkin offers biting yet humorous essays in the tradition of Saul Bellow and Philip Roth.
The book is rated 3.77/5 at goodreads.com, from 22 ratings. See 3 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2mFsl1a.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2pqu35g.

A non-fiction book recommendation: Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

A critic review (source Star Tribune) can be read at: http://strib.mn/2paGIZn.
Much of “Dear Ijeawele” will feel familiar to those who know Adichie’s previous works, but this book is more personal, more urgent. “I want to help create the world my daughter will love, to hasten the coming of true justice. I want the world to be better,” she says.
Book description from Google Books:
New York Times Best SellerA Skimm Reads PickFrom the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists comes a powerful new statement about feminism today–written as a letter to a friend. A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.     Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.
The book is rated 4.56/5 at goodreads.com, from 7821 ratings. See 1338 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2pLVsC2.
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Google Books preview available in full post.

A non-fiction book recommendation: Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2sC7Fb2.
This is a very interesting, informative account of a virtually unknown episode in American history, not to mention well written and cogent by bestselling author, David Grann. Although there seems to be a trend recently toward notes based on quotes and other terms and expressions in the text, the research is there that underlies this story.
Book description from Google Books:
“Disturbing and riveting…Grann has proved himself a master of spinning delicious, many-layered mysteries that also happen to be true…It will sear your soul.” –Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review From New Yorker staff writer David Grann, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history         In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.       Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.       In this last remnant of the Wild West–where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed–many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection.  Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.        In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
The book is rated 4.21/5 at goodreads.com, from 7800 ratings. See 1330 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2sCexVG.
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A non-fiction book recommendation: Float by Anne Carson

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2mJVJEl.
She herself has written something wild and weird and luminous. She writes how you might write if you were not constrained, not afraid of being misunderstood. We can’t be free all the time, but Carson provides the hint of a door — or, failing that, a match.
Book description from Google Books:
From the renowned classicist and MacArthur Prize winner: a new collection that explores myth and memory, beauty and loss, all the while playing with–and pushing–the limits of language and form. Anne Carson consistently dazzles with her inventive, shape-shifting work and the vividness of her imagination. Float reaches an even greater level of brilliance and surprise. Presented in an arrestingly original format–individual chapbooks that can be read in any order, and that float inside a transparent case–this collection conjures a mix of voices, time periods, and structures to explore what makes people, memories, and stories “maddeningly attractive” when observed in spaces that are suggestively in-between.      One can begin with Carson contemplating Proust on a frozen Icelandic plain, or on the art-saturated streets of downtown New York City. Or journey to the peak of Mount Olympus, where Zeus ponders his own afterlife. Or find a chorus of Gertrude Steins performing an essay about falling–a piece that also unearths poignant memories of Carson’s own father and great-uncle in rural Canada. And a poem called “Wildly Constant” piercingly explores the highs and lows of marriage and monogamy, distilled in a wife’s waking up her husband from the darkness of night, and asking him to make them eggs for breakfast.      Exquisite, heartbreaking, disarmingly funny, Float kaleidoscopically illuminates the uncanny magic that comes with letting go of expectations and boundaries. It is Carson’s most intellectually electrifying, emotionally engaging book to date.
The book is rated 4.32/5 at goodreads.com, from 256 ratings. See 37 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2mmxjhL.
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A non-fiction book recommendation: The Other One Percent: Indians in America (Modern South Asia) by Sanjoy Chakravorty

A critic review (source The Economist) can be read at: http://econ.st/2mwzHVG.
…“The Other One Percent” is a rigorous, fact-based analysis of how cross-border flows of brainy and ambitious people make the world a better place. Politicians and policymakers in both America and in India should make sure they read it.
Book description from Google Books:
One of the most remarkable stories of immigration in the last half century is that of Indians to the United States. People of Indian origin make up a little over one percent of the American population now, up from barely half a percent at the turn of the millennium. Not only has its recentgrowth been extraordinary, but this population from a developing nation with low human capital is now the most-educated and highest-income group in the world’s most advanced nation. The Other One Percent is a careful, data-driven, and comprehensive account of the three core processes – selection,assimilation, and entrepreneurship – that have led to this rapid rise. This unique phenomenon is driven by – and, in turn, has influenced – wide-ranging changes, especially the ongoing revolution in information technology and its impact on economic globalization, immigration policies in the U.S.,higher education policies in India, and foreign policies of both nations. If the overall picture is one of economic success, the details reveal the critical issues faced by the immigrants stemming from the social, linguistic, and class structure in India, the professional and geographicdistribution in the U.S., the simultaneous expressions of pan-Indian and regional identities and simultaneous leadership in high-skill industries (like computers and medicine) and low-skill industries (like hospitality and retail trade), and the multi-generational challenges of a diverse group fromthe world’s largest democracy fitting into its oldest.
The book is rated 3.62/5 at goodreads.com, from 8 ratings. See 1 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2mXCDHX.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tw7AJt.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A non-fiction book recommendation: Pieces of Soap: Essays by Stanley Elkin

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2mFsWjy.
There’s a tendency to approach a posthumous collection of work by an esteemed “writer’s writer” with respectful courtesy, but Stanley Elkin’s essays demand a rowdier response from readers. They’re weird and spirited, full of literal piss and vinegar.
Book description from Google Books:
These incisive, utterly unique pieces swoop and soar from Hollywood to Fifth Avenue, from show biz to high literature, from first sex to the First Amendment, attacking America’s absurdities with an informed sense of the serious. Elkin offers biting yet humorous essays in the tradition of Saul Bellow and Philip Roth.
The book is rated 3.77/5 at goodreads.com, from 22 ratings. See 3 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2mFsl1a.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2pqu35g.

A non-fiction book recommendation: Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977-2002) by David Sedaris

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2s4Y1Nz.
…Sedaris’s developing voice is the lifeline that pulls him through the murk. In the last year of the diaries, with Sedaris a now-established best-selling author and world traveler, the prickly Southern wit is still intact and sparkling…
Book description from Google Books:
One of the most anticipated books of 2017: Boston Globe, New York Times Book Review, New York’s “Vulture”, The Week, Bustle, BookRiotDavid Sedaris tells all in a book that is, literally, a lifetime in the makingFor forty years, David Sedaris has kept a diary in which he records everything that captures his attention-overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and through them he has honed his cunning, surprising sentences.Now, Sedaris shares his private writings with the world. Theft by Finding, the first of two volumes, is the story of how a drug-abusing dropout with a weakness for the International House of Pancakes and a chronic inability to hold down a real job became one of the funniest people on the planet.Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit that even a misanthropic sense of humor can’t fully disguise, Theft By Finding proves that Sedaris is one of our great modern observers. It’s a potent reminder that when you’re as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, there’s no such thing as a boring day.
The book is rated 4.10/5 at goodreads.com, from 2855 ratings. See 474 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2tnX6f5.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tnFsIo.