A parenting-relationships book recommendation: The Dad Report: Fathers, Sons, and Baseball Families by Kevin Cook

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2cxe8hS.
Charming and endearing and a perfect way to kill time between innings, The Dad Report is a service to the bond few understand and those who do have an even more difficult time explaining.
Book description from Google Books:
Baseball honors legacies–from cheering the home team to breaking in an old glove handed down from father to son. In The Dad Report, award-winning sportswriter Kevin Cook weaves a tapestry of uplifting stories in which fathers and sons–from the sport’s superstars to Cook and his own ball-playing father–share the game.Almost two hundred father-son pairs have played in the big leagues. Cook takes us inside the clubhouses, homes, and lives of many of the greats. Aaron Boone follows grandfather Bob, father Ray, and brother Bret to the majors–three generations of All-Stars. Barry Bonds and Ken Griffey Jr. strive to outdo their famous dads. Michael Jordan walks away from basketball to play minor-league baseball–to fulfill his father’s dream.In visiting these legendary families, Cook discovers that ball-playing families are a lot like our own. Dan Haren regrets the long road trips that keep him from his kids. Ike Davis and his father, a former Yankee, debate whether Ike should pitch or play first base. Buddy Bell leads a generation of big-leaguers determined to open their workplace–the clubhouse–to their kids.Framing The Dad Report is the story of Kevin Cook’s own father, Art Cook, a minor-league pitcher, a loveable rogue with a wicked screwball. In Art’s later years, Kevin phoned him almost every night to talk baseball. They called those nightly conversations “the Dad Report.” In time, Kevin came to see that these conversations were about much more than the game. That’s what this book is about: the way fathers and sons talk baseball as a way of talking about everything–courage, fear, fun, family, morality, mortality, and how it’s not whether you win or lose that counts, it’s how you share the game.
The book is rated 3.68/5 at goodreads.com, from 28 ratings. See 8 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cxebtP.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2txu9yx.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: In the Slender Margin: The Intimate Strangeness of Death and Dying by Eve Joseph

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dfLEvR.
Joseph’s lack of judgment, her willingness to listen to the world of loss, and to invent for us an intimate language for grief makes death a site of wonder as much as pain.
Book description from Google Books:
Like Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking, an extraordinarily moving and engaging look at loss and death. Eve Joseph is an award-winning poet who worked for twenty years as a palliative care counselor in a hospice. When she was a young girl, she lost a much older brother, and her experience as a grown woman helping others face death, dying, and grief opens the path for her to recollect and understand his loss in a way she could not as a child. In the Slender Margin is an insider’s look at an experience that awaits us all, and that is at once deeply fascinating, frightening, and in modern society shunned. The book is an intimate invitation to consider death and our response to it without fear or morbidity, but rather with wonder and a curious mind. Writing with a poet’s precise language and in short meditative chapters leavened with insight, warmth, and occasional humor, Joseph cites her hospice experience as well as the writings of others across generations–from the realms of mythology, psychology, science, religion, history, and literature–to illuminate the many facets of dying and death. Offering examples from cultural traditions, practices, and beliefs from around the world, her book is at once an exploration of the unknowable and a very humane journey through the land of grief.
The book is rated 4.00/5 at goodreads.com, from 128 ratings. See 26 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cqn59h.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sLrXyU.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: Avalanche: A Love Story by Julia Leigh

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2eI2EpK.
It is one of the first intelligent, personal accounts of the daily business of IVF, and as such will surely be a useful (albeit rather demoralising) resource for other women.
Book description from Google Books:
At the age of 38, acclaimed novelist Julia Leigh made her first visit to the in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic, full of hope. So started a long and costly journey of nightly injections, blood tests, surgeries, and rituals. Writing in the immediate aftermath of her decision to stop treatment, Leigh lays bare the truths of her experience: the highs of hope and the depths of disappointment, the grip of yearning and desire, the toll on her relationships, and the unexpected graces and moments of black humor. Along the way she navigates the science of IVF, copes with the impact of treatment, and reconciles the seductive promises of the worldwide multi-billion-dollar IVF industry with the reality. Avalanche is the book that has finally been written on IVF treatment: a courageous, compelling, and ultimately wise account of a profoundly important and widespread experience. At the heart of this work is an exploration of who and how we love. It is a story we can all relate to–about the dreams we have, defeated or otherwise, for ourselves, our loves, and our relationships. Avalanche bears witness to Leigh’s raw desire, suffering, strength, and, in the end, transformation, and her shift to a different kind of love.–Adapted from dust jacket.
The book is rated 3.67/5 at goodreads.com, from 242 ratings. See 51 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dNjoOP.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2twBOwX.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: The Dad Report: Fathers, Sons, and Baseball Families by Kevin Cook

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2cxe8hS.
Charming and endearing and a perfect way to kill time between innings, The Dad Report is a service to the bond few understand and those who do have an even more difficult time explaining.
Book description from Google Books:
Baseball honors legacies–from cheering the home team to breaking in an old glove handed down from father to son. In The Dad Report, award-winning sportswriter Kevin Cook weaves a tapestry of uplifting stories in which fathers and sons–from the sport’s superstars to Cook and his own ball-playing father–share the game.Almost two hundred father-son pairs have played in the big leagues. Cook takes us inside the clubhouses, homes, and lives of many of the greats. Aaron Boone follows grandfather Bob, father Ray, and brother Bret to the majors–three generations of All-Stars. Barry Bonds and Ken Griffey Jr. strive to outdo their famous dads. Michael Jordan walks away from basketball to play minor-league baseball–to fulfill his father’s dream.In visiting these legendary families, Cook discovers that ball-playing families are a lot like our own. Dan Haren regrets the long road trips that keep him from his kids. Ike Davis and his father, a former Yankee, debate whether Ike should pitch or play first base. Buddy Bell leads a generation of big-leaguers determined to open their workplace–the clubhouse–to their kids.Framing The Dad Report is the story of Kevin Cook’s own father, Art Cook, a minor-league pitcher, a loveable rogue with a wicked screwball. In Art’s later years, Kevin phoned him almost every night to talk baseball. They called those nightly conversations “the Dad Report.” In time, Kevin came to see that these conversations were about much more than the game. That’s what this book is about: the way fathers and sons talk baseball as a way of talking about everything–courage, fear, fun, family, morality, mortality, and how it’s not whether you win or lose that counts, it’s how you share the game.
The book is rated 3.68/5 at goodreads.com, from 28 ratings. See 8 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cxebtP.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: .

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: The Selfishness of Others: An Essay on the Fear of Narcissism by Kristin Dombek

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2d7SCyf.
Dombek’s “The Selfishness of Others: An Essay on the Fear of Narcissism” is a treatise that comes in at just under 140 pages of text, dense with information but light on its feet.
Book description from Google Books:
They’re among us, but they are not like us. They manipulate, lie, cheat, and steal. They are irresistibly charming and accomplished, appearing to live in a radiance beyond what we are capable of. But narcissists are empty. No one knows exactly what everyone else is full of–some kind of a soul, or personhood–but whatever it is, experts agree that narcissists do not have it.So goes the popular understanding of narcissism, or NPD (narcissistic personality disorder). And it’s more prevalent than ever, according to recent articles in The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Time. In bestsellers like The Narcissism Epidemic, Narcissists Exposed, and The Narcissist Next Door, pop psychologists have armed the normal with tools to identify and combat the vampiric influence of this rising population, while on websites like narcissismsurvivor.com, thousands of people congregate to swap horror stories about relationships with “narcs.”In The Selfishness of Others, the essayist Kristin Dombek provides a clear-sighted account of how a rare clinical diagnosis became a fluid cultural phenomenon, a repository for our deepest fears about love, friendship, and family. She cuts through hysteria in search of the razor-thin line between pathology and common selfishness, writing with robust skepticism toward the prophets of NPD and genuine empathy for those who see themselves as its victims. And finally, she shares her own story in a candid effort to find a path away from the cycle of fear and blame and toward a more forgiving and rewarding life.
The book is rated 3.67/5 at goodreads.com, from 503 ratings. See 80 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2d7SkYi.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sz3CMr.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: First Dads: Parenting and Politics from George Washington to Barack Obama by Joshua Kendall

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2cLDMQ5.
More than anything, “First Dads” provides a valuable reminder that while an American president may have the clout to launch spaceships and end world wars, that doesn’t mean he can get his children to behave, be happy or even return his calls.
Book description from Google Books:
Every president has had some experience as a parent. Of the 43 men who have served in the nation’s highest office, 38 have fathered biological children and the other five adopted children. Each president’s parenting style reveals much about his beliefs as well as his psychological make-up. James Garfield enjoyed jumping on the bed with his kids. FDR’s children, on the other hand, had to make appointments to talk to him. In a lively narrative, based on research in archives around the country, Kendall shows presidential character in action. Readers will learn which type of parent might be best suited to leading the American people and, finally, how the fathering experiences of our presidents have forever changed the course of American history.
The book is rated 3.41/5 at goodreads.com, from 97 ratings. See 30 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cLDoRo.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tVirKY.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: An Abbreviated Life: A Memoir by Ariel Leve

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2cvDrAP.
…the many passages about her attempts to overcome the traumas of her youth can sound canned and overprocessed, as if they’d been run through a therapy software program. Yet I forgave her for them. It was hard not to. For Ms. Leve, the simple act of growing up was exhausting.
Book description from Google Books:
“Mesmerizing… A portrait of something familiar gone wildly, tragically awry.”—The New York Times“Sometimes, a child is born to a parent who can’t be a parent, and, like a seedling in the shade, has to grow toward a distant sun. Ariel Leve’s spare and powerful memoir will remind us that family isn’t everything—kindness and nurturing are.”  —Gloria SteinemAriel Leve grew up in Manhattan with an eccentric mother she describes as “a poet, an artist, a self-appointed troublemaker and attention seeker.” Leve learned to become her own parent, taking care of herself and her mother’s needs. There would be uncontrolled, impulsive rages followed with denial, disavowed responsibility, and then extreme outpourings of affection. How does a child learn to feel safe in this topsyturvy world of conditional love?Leve captures the chaos and lasting impact of a child’s life under siege and explores how the coping mechanisms she developed to survive later incapacitated her as an adult. There were material comforts, but no emotional safety, except for summer visits to her father’s home in South East Asia-an escape that was terminated after he attempted to gain custody. Following the death of a loving caretaker, a succession of replacements raised Leve—relationships which resulted in intense attachment and loss. It was not until decades later, when Leve moved to other side of the world, that she could begin to emancipate herself from the past. In a relationship with a man who has children, caring for them yields a clarity of what was missing.In telling her haunting story, Leve seeks to understand the effects of chronic psychological maltreatment on a child’s developing brain, and to discover how to build a life for herself that she never dreamed possible: An unabbreviated life.
The book is rated 3.89/5 at goodreads.com, from 638 ratings. See 100 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cY0S30.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2s6a5OC.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: Land of Enchantment by Leigh Stein

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2drELlS.
Because her memoir is told with some time behind it, Stein is able to reexamine and to edit her story, or at least to reframe it.
Book description from Google Books:
Set against the stark and surreal landscape of New Mexico, Land of Enchantment is a coming-of-age memoir about young love, obsession, and loss, and how a person can imprint a place in your mind forever.   When Leigh Stein received a call from an unknown number in July 2011, she let it go to voice mail, assuming it would be her ex-boyfriend Jason. Instead, the call was from his brother: Jason had been killed in a motorcycle accident. He was twenty-three years old. She had seen him alive just a few weeks earlier. Leigh first met Jason at an audition for a tragic play. He was nineteen and troubled and intensely magnetic, a dead ringer for James Dean. Leigh was twenty-two and living at home with her parents, trying to figure out what to do with her young adult life. Within months, they had fallen in love and moved to New Mexico, the “Land of Enchantment,” a place neither of them had ever been. But what was supposed to be a romantic adventure quickly turned sinister, as Jason’s behavior went from playful and spontaneous to controlling and erratic, eventually escalating to violence. Now New Mexico was marked by isolation and the anxiety of how to leave a man she both loved and feared. Even once Leigh moved on to New York, throwing herself into her work, Jason and their time together haunted her. Land of Enchantment lyrically explores the heartbreaking complexity of why the person hurting you the most can be impossible to leave.. With searing honesty and cutting humor, Leigh wrestles with what made her fall in love with someone so destructive and how to grieve a man who wasn’t always good to her.
The book is rated 3.88/5 at goodreads.com, from 234 ratings. See 60 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cQ1vhW.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sfHC9e.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: They Left Us Everything: A Memoir by Plum Johnson

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2cLpba9.
It’s the kind of slim, unassuming memoir that hits you deep in the gut, leaving you bruised and thoughtful long after its last page.
Book description from Google Books:
Winner of the 2015 RBC Taylor Prize Winner of the 2016 Forest of Reading� Evergreen Award(tm)  After almost twenty years of caring for elderly parents–first for their senile father,  and then for their cantankerous ninety-three-year-old mother–author Plum Johnson  and her three younger brothers experience conflicted feelings of grief and relief when  their mother, the surviving parent, dies. Now they must empty and sell the beloved  family home, which hasn’t been de-cluttered in more than half a century. Twenty-three  rooms bulge with history, antiques, and oxygen tanks. Plum remembers her loving  but difficult parents who could not have been more different: the British father, a  handsome, disciplined patriarch who nonetheless could not control his opinionated,  extroverted Southern-belle wife who loved tennis and gin gimlets. The task consumes  her, becoming more rewarding than she ever imagined. Items from childhood trigger  memories of her eccentric family growing up in a small town on the shores of Lake  Ontario in the 1950s and 60s. But unearthing new facts about her parents helps her  reconcile those relationships with a more accepting perspective about who they were  and what they valued.   They Left Us Everything is a funny, touching memoir about the importance of preserving  family history to make sense of the past and nurturing family bonds to safeguard the  future.
The book is rated 3.82/5 at goodreads.com, from 1917 ratings. See 394 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cLq6Ye.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tJxg5y.

A parenting-relationships book recommendation: Love Warrior: A Memoir by Glennon Doyle Melton

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2ljorLd.
…she discovers her husband is wrestling his own addictions: to pornography and sex with strangers. How she — and he — rebuild their lives, together and apart, is what makes “Love Warrior” so riveting.
Book description from Google Books:
#1 New York Times BestsellerThe Newest Oprah’s Bookclub 2016 SelectionThe highly anticipated new memoir by bestselling author Glennon Doyle Melton tells the story of her journey of self-discovery after the implosion of her marriage.Just when Glennon Doyle Melton was beginning to feel she had it all figured out—three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York Times bestseller list—her husband revealed his infidelity and she was forced to realize that nothing was as it seemed. A recovering alcoholic and bulimic, Glennon found that rock bottom was a familiar place. In the midst of crisis, she knew to hold on to what she discovered in recovery: that her deepest pain has always held within it an invitation to a richer life.Love Warrior is the story of one marriage, but it is also the story of the healing that is possible for any of us when we refuse to settle for good enough and begin to face pain and love head-on. This astonishing memoir reveals how our ideals of masculinity and femininity can make it impossible for a man and a woman to truly know one another—and it captures the beauty that unfolds when one couple commits to unlearning everything they’ve been taught so that they can finally, after thirteen years of marriage, commit to living true—true to themselves and to each other. Love Warrior is a gorgeous and inspiring account of how we are born to be warriors: strong, powerful, and brave; able to confront the pain and claim the love that exists for us all. This chronicle of a beautiful, brutal journey speaks to anyone who yearns for deeper, truer relationships and a more abundant, authentic life.
The book is rated 4.10/5 at goodreads.com, from 24953 ratings. See 3085 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ljovdK.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2s5O2aX.
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