A sci-fi book recommendation: Alan Moore: The Complete WildC. A. T.s by Alan Moore

A critic review (source Financial Times) can be read at: http://on.ft.com/2tALshX.
Unquestionably Jerusalem is Moore’s most ambitious statement yet — his War and Peace, his Ulysses. The prose scintillates throughout, a traffic jam of hooting dialect and vernacular trundling nose-to-tail with pantechnicons of pop culture allusion.
Book description from Google Books:
Written by Alan Moore Art by Travis Charest, Mat Broome, Ryan Benjamin and others Cover by Charest Alan Moore is considered by many to be the finest comics writer of the last quarter century. His standout achievements in the medium include WATCHMEN, V FOR VENDETTA, THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, and From Hell. Now Moore’s defining run on WildC.A.T.s is collected into a single volume, collecting WILDC.A.T.S. #21-34, plus a story from issue #50, featuring the impressive art of Travis Charest and other fine artists who provide breathtaking visuals. Alan Moore took the WILDC.A.T.S back to their roots and stirred up the WildStorm Universe considerably, creating a perfect starting point for catching up the flagship WildStorm superhero team. It’s a tale filled with unsettling revelations and gripping drama – and the introduction of one of WildStorm’s great villains: Tao! On sale January 2
The book is rated 3.32/5 at goodreads.com, from 448 ratings. See 32 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2tR5QXy.
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A sci-fi book recommendation: Jerusalem by Alan Moore

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2tyPwPS.
If cleverness were all that mattered, “Jerusalem” would be everything. Its pyrotechnics never let up, and Moore never stops calling attention to them…What redeems the relentless spectacle, though, is that it’s in the service of a passionate argument.
Book description from Google Books:
In the epic novel Jerusalem, Alan Moore channels both the ecstatic visions of William Blake and the theoretical physics of Albert Einstein through the hardscrabble streets and alleys of his hometown of Northampton, UK. In the half a square mile of decay and demolition that was England’s Saxon capital, eternity is loitering between the firetrap housing projects. Embedded in the grubby amber of the district’s narrative among its saints, kings, prostitutes, and derelicts, a different kind of human time is happening, a soiled simultaneity that does not differentiate between the petrol-colored puddles and the fractured dreams of those who navigate them.Employing, a kaleidoscope of literary forms and styles that ranges from brutal social realism to extravagant children’s fantasy, from the modern stage drama to the extremes of science fiction, Jerusalem’s dizzyingly rich cast of characters includes the living, the dead, the celestial, and the infernal in an intricately woven tapestry that presents a vision of an absolute and timeless human reality in all of its exquisite, comical, and heartbreaking splendor.In these pages lurk demons from the second-century Book of Tobit and angels with golden blood who reduce fate to a snooker tournament. Vagrants, prostitutes, and ghosts rub shoulders with Oliver Cromwell, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce’s tragic daughter Lucia, and Buffalo Bill, among many others. There is a conversation in the thunderstruck dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral, childbirth on the cobblestones of Lambeth Walk, an estranged couple sitting all night on the cold steps of a Gothic church front, and an infant choking on a cough drop for eleven chapters. An art exhibition is in preparation, and above the world a naked old man and a beautiful dead baby race along the Attics of the Breath toward the heat death of the universe.An opulent mythology for those without a pot to piss in, through the labyrinthine streets and pages of Jerusalem tread ghosts that sing of wealth, poverty, and our threadbare millennium. They discuss English as a visionary language from John Bunyan to James Joyce, hold forth on the illusion of mortality post-Einstein, and insist upon the meanest slum as Blake’s eternal holy city.
The book is rated 3.96/5 at goodreads.com, from 691 ratings. See 234 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2fOQ4cU.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tPFLrG.

A sci-fi book recommendation: Jerusalem by Alan Moore

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2tyPwPS.
If cleverness were all that mattered, “Jerusalem” would be everything. Its pyrotechnics never let up, and Moore never stops calling attention to them…What redeems the relentless spectacle, though, is that it’s in the service of a passionate argument.
Book description from Google Books:
In the epic novel Jerusalem, Alan Moore channels both the ecstatic visions of William Blake and the theoretical physics of Albert Einstein through the hardscrabble streets and alleys of his hometown of Northampton, UK. In the half a square mile of decay and demolition that was England’s Saxon capital, eternity is loitering between the firetrap housing projects. Embedded in the grubby amber of the district’s narrative among its saints, kings, prostitutes, and derelicts, a different kind of human time is happening, a soiled simultaneity that does not differentiate between the petrol-colored puddles and the fractured dreams of those who navigate them.Employing, a kaleidoscope of literary forms and styles that ranges from brutal social realism to extravagant children’s fantasy, from the modern stage drama to the extremes of science fiction, Jerusalem’s dizzyingly rich cast of characters includes the living, the dead, the celestial, and the infernal in an intricately woven tapestry that presents a vision of an absolute and timeless human reality in all of its exquisite, comical, and heartbreaking splendor.In these pages lurk demons from the second-century Book of Tobit and angels with golden blood who reduce fate to a snooker tournament. Vagrants, prostitutes, and ghosts rub shoulders with Oliver Cromwell, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce’s tragic daughter Lucia, and Buffalo Bill, among many others. There is a conversation in the thunderstruck dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral, childbirth on the cobblestones of Lambeth Walk, an estranged couple sitting all night on the cold steps of a Gothic church front, and an infant choking on a cough drop for eleven chapters. An art exhibition is in preparation, and above the world a naked old man and a beautiful dead baby race along the Attics of the Breath toward the heat death of the universe.An opulent mythology for those without a pot to piss in, through the labyrinthine streets and pages of Jerusalem tread ghosts that sing of wealth, poverty, and our threadbare millennium. They discuss English as a visionary language from John Bunyan to James Joyce, hold forth on the illusion of mortality post-Einstein, and insist upon the meanest slum as Blake’s eternal holy city.
The book is rated 3.96/5 at goodreads.com, from 691 ratings. See 234 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2fOQ4cU.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tPFLrG.

A sci-fi book recommendation: Lincoln in the Bardo: A Novel by George Saunders

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2tBiPk2.
In language reminiscent of James Joyce’s inventive interior monologues, and contentious scenes recalling the graveyard bickering of fellow Irish novelist Máirtín Ó Cadhain’s Cré na Cille…Lincoln in the Bardo fulfills the promise of Saunders’ twisted, inventive, and compassionate short stories.
Book description from Google Books:
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * The long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December: a moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. “My poor boy, he was too good for this earth,” the president says at the time. “God has called him home.” Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy’s body. From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state–called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo–a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul. Lincoln in the Bardo is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. Formally daring, generous in spirit, deeply concerned with matters of the heart, it is a testament to fiction’s ability to speak honestly and powerfully to the things that really matter to us. Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end? Praise for Lincoln in the Bardo “A luminous feat of generosity and humanism.”–Colson Whitehead, The New York Times Book Review “A masterpiece.”–Zadie Smith “Ingenious . . . Saunders–well on his way toward becoming a twenty-first-century Twain–crafts an American patchwork of love and loss, giving shape to our foundational sorrows.”–Vogue “Saunders is the most humane American writer working today.”–Harper’s Magazine “The novel beats with a present-day urgency–a nation at war with itself, the unbearable grief of a father who has lost a child, and a howling congregation of ghosts, as divided in death as in life, unwilling to move on.”–Vanity Fair “A brilliant, Buddhist reimagining of an American story of great loss and great love.”–Elle “Wildly imaginative”–Marie Claire “Mesmerizing . . . Dantesque . . . A haunting American ballad.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review) “Exhilarating . . . Ruthless and relentless in its evocation not only of Lincoln and his quandary, but also of the tenuous existential state shared by all of us.” –Kirkus Reviews (starred review) “It’s unlike anything you’ve ever read, except that the grotesque humor, pathos, and, ultimately, human kindness at its core mark it as a work that could come only from Saunders.”–The National
The book is rated 3.96/5 at goodreads.com, from 21078 ratings. See 4777 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2p1u5DC.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2p1sFJ4.

A sci-fi book recommendation: Little Nothing by Marisa Silver

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2dXAnec.
Marisa Silver’s beguiling new novel, “Little Nothing,” is a powerful exploration of the relationship between our changeable bodies and our just as malleable identities.
Book description from Google Books:
A Huffington Post Book Club Suggestion * An O: The Oprah Magazine Fall Pick * A LitHub Book You Should Read This September * One of The Millions’ “Most Anticipated” for 2016 “Marisa Silver’s beguiling new novel Little Nothing is a powerful exploration of the relationship between our changeable bodies and our just as malleable identities…Silver’s storytelling skills are finely matched to her themes…meditative passages bloom with life.” –Matt Bell, The New York Times Book Review   A stunning, provocative new novel from New York Times bestselling author Marisa Silver, Little Nothing is the story of a girl, scorned for her physical deformity, whose passion and salvation lie in her otherworldly ability to transform herself and the world around her. In an unnamed country at the beginning of the last century, a child called Pavla is born to peasant parents. Her arrival, fervently anticipated and conceived in part by gypsy tonics and archaic prescriptions, stuns her parents and brings outrage and scorn from her community. Pavla has been born a dwarf, beautiful in face, but as the years pass, she grows no farther than the edge of her crib. When her parents turn to the treatments of a local charlatan, his terrifying cure opens the floodgates of persecution for Pavla. Little Nothing unfolds across a lifetime of unimaginable, magical transformation in and out of human form, as an outcast girl becomes a hunted woman whose ultimate survival depends on the most startling transfiguration of them all.  Woven throughout is the journey of Danilo, the young man entranced by Pavla, obsessed only with protecting her. Part allegory about the shifting nature of being, part subversive fairy tale of love in all its uncanny guises, Little Nothing spans the beginning of a new century, the disintegration of ancient superstitions, and the adoption of industry and invention. With a cast of remarkable characters, a wholly original story, and extraordinary, page-turning prose, Marisa Silver delivers a novel of sheer electricity.
The book is rated 3.53/5 at goodreads.com, from 713 ratings. See 203 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dXCyOY.
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A sci-fi book recommendation: Time Travel by James Gleick

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2dCqMfU.
The good news? “Time Travel,” like all of Gleick’s work, is a fascinating mash-up of philosophy, literary criticism, physics and cultural observation.
Book description from Google Books:
“A time-jumping, head-tripping odyssey.” –The Millions “A bracing swim in the waters of science, technology and fiction.” –Washington Post “A thrilling journey of ideas.” –Boston Globe From the acclaimed author of The Information and Chaos, here is a mind-bending exploration of time travel: its subversive origins, its evolution in literature and science, and its influence on our understanding of time itself. The story begins at the turn of the previous century, with the young H. G. Wells writing and rewriting the fantastic tale that became his first book and an international sensation: The Time Machine. It was an era when a host of forces was converging to transmute the human understanding of time, some philosophical and some technological: the electric telegraph, the steam railroad, the discovery of buried civilizations, and the perfection of clocks. James Gleick tracks the evolution of time travel as an idea that becomes part of contemporary culture–from Marcel Proust to Doctor Who, from Jorge Luis Borges to Woody Allen. He investigates the inevitable looping paradoxes and examines the porous boundary between pulp fiction and modern physics. Finally, he delves into a temporal shift that is unsettling our own moment: the instantaneous wired world, with its all-consuming present and vanishing future. (With a color frontispiece and black-and-white illustrations throughout) 
The book is rated 3.58/5 at goodreads.com, from 1622 ratings. See 340 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2evrJnQ.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tehIDj.

A sci-fi book recommendation: Europe in Winter by Dave Hutchinson

A critic review (source Financial Times) can be read at: http://on.ft.com/2meZX4k.
A confident mix of sly satire and diffident humour with intricate jigsaw plotting and political acumen.
Book description from Google Books:
Union has come. The Community is now the largest nation in Europe; trains run there from as far afield as London and Prague. It is an era of unprecedented peace and prosperity. So what is the reason for a huge terrorist outrage? Why do the Community and Europe meet in secret, exchanging hostages? And who are Les Coureurs des Bois? Along with a motley crew of strays and mafiosi and sleeper agents, Rudi sets out to answer these questions – only to discover that the truth lies both closer to home and farther away than anyone could possibly imagine.
The book is rated 4.11/5 at goodreads.com, from 305 ratings. See 49 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2mBHilH.
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A sci-fi book recommendation: Night Flight (Harbrace Paperbound Library, Hpl63) by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dQnqGm.
This, then, is The Little Prince for grownups: a story about what one makes of an immense solitude (very well translated by David Carter; and the cover of the book is beautifully conceived), written by a remarkable man…
Book description from Google Books:
In this gripping novel, Saint-Exupéry tells about the brave men who piloted night mail planes from Patagonia, Chile, and Paraguay to Argentina in the early days of commercial aviation. Preface by André Gide. Translated by Stuart Gilbert.
The book is rated 3.79/5 at goodreads.com, from 4788 ratings. See 297 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2eLpz3I.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sby9ja.
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A sci-fi book recommendation: The Secret History of Twin Peaks by Mark Frost

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2kvgjTH.
It re-introduces all the major elements of the show, sets up the next season, and fills in a lot of blanks for anyone who’s ever been interested in the evil that lurks in those woods.
Book description from Google Books:
From the co-creator of the landmark series, the story millions of fans have been waiting to get their hands on for 25 long years.The Secret History of Twin Peaks enlarges the world of the original series, placing the unexplained phenomena that unfolded there into a vastly layered, wide-ranging history, beginning with the journals of Lewis and Clark and ending with the shocking events that closed the finale. The perfect way to get in the mood for the upcoming Showtime series.
The book is rated 4.00/5 at goodreads.com, from 3618 ratings. See 633 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2kvgoGZ.
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A sci-fi book recommendation: The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Adam Gidwitz

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2fe38sk.
What Gidwitz, the author of the Grimm trilogy, accomplishes here is staggering. “The Inquisitor’s Tale” is equal parts swashbuckling epic, medieval morality play, religious polemic and bawdy burlesque, propelling us toward a white-knuckle climax…
Book description from Google Books:
A 2017 Newbery Honor Book Winner of the Sydney Taylor Book Award  An exciting and hilarious medieval adventure from the bestselling author of A Tale Dark and Grimm. Beautifully illustrated throughout!  The Inquisitor”s Tale is one of the most celebrated children”s books of the year! ★ New York Times Bestseller ★ A New York Times Editor”s Choice ★ A New York Times Notable Children”s Book ★ A People Magazine Kid Pick ★ A Washington Post Best Children”s Book ★ A Wall Street Journal Best Children”s Book ★ An Entertainment Weekly Best Middle Grade Book ★ A Booklist Best Book ★ A Horn Book Fanfare Best Book ★ A Kirkus Reviews Best Book ★ A Publishers Weekly Best Book ★ A School Library Journal Best Book ★ An ALA Notable Children”s Book “A profound and ambitious tour de force. Gidwitz is a masterful storyteller.” –Matt de la Pe�a, Newbery Medalist and New York Times bestselling author   “What Gidwitz accomplishes here is staggering.” –New York Times Book Review Includes a detailed historical note and bibliography  1242. On a dark night, travelers from across France cross paths at an inn and begin to tell stories of three children. Their adventures take them on a chase through France: they are taken captive by knights, sit alongside a king, and save the land from a farting dragon. On the run to escape prejudice and persecution and save precious and holy texts from being burned, their quest drives them forward to a final showdown at Mont Saint-Michel, where all will come to question if these children can perform the miracles of saints.   Join William, an oblate on a mission from his monastery; Jacob, a Jewish boy who has fled his burning villa≥ and Jeanne, a peasant girl who hides her prophetic visions. They are accompanied by Jeanne”s loyal greyhound, Gwenforte . . . recently brought back from the dead. Told in multiple voices, in a style reminiscent of The Canterbury Tales, our narrator collects their stories and the saga of these three unlikely allies begins to come together.  Beloved bestselling author Adam Gidwitz makes his long awaited return with his first new world since his hilarious and critically acclaimed Grimm series. Featuring manuscript illuminations throughout by illustrator Hatem Aly and filled with Adam”s trademark style and humor, The Inquisitor”s Tale is bold storytelling that”s richly researched and adventure-packed. “It”s no surprise that Gidwitz”s latest book has been likened to The Canterbury Tales, considering its central story is told by multiple storytellers. As each narrator fills in what happens next in the story of the three children and their potentially holy dog, their tales get not only more fantastical but also more puzzling and addictive. However, the gradual intricacy of the story that is not Gidwitz”s big accomplishment. Rather it is the complex themes (xenophobia, zealotry, censorship etc.) he is able to bring up while still maintaining a light tone, thus giving readers a chance to come to conclusions themselves. (Also, there is a farting dragon.)”–Entertainment Weekly, “Best MG Books of 2016 “Puckish, learned, serendipitous . . . Sparkling medieval adventure.” –Wall Street Journal ★ “Gidwitz strikes literary gold with this mirthful and compulsively readable adventure story. . . . A masterpiece of storytelling that is addictive and engrossing.” –Kirkus, starred review ★ “A well-researched and rambunctiously entertaining story that has as much to say about the present as it does the past.” –Publishers Weekly, starred review ★ “Gidwitz proves himself a nimble storyteller as he weaves history, excitement, and multiple narrative threads into a taut, inspired adventure.” –Booklist, starred review ★ “Scatological humor, serious matter, colloquial present-day language, the ideal of diversity and mutual understanding–this has it all.” –The Horn Book, starred review ★ “I have never read a book like this. It”s weird, and unfamiliar, and religious, and irreligious, and more fun than it has any right to be. . . . Gidwitz is on fire here, making medieval history feel fresh and current.” –School Library Journal, starred review
The book is rated 4.20/5 at goodreads.com, from 3239 ratings. See 914 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2e8Wy1W.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2trww51.