A sport book recommendation: The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries From a Secret World by Peter Wohlleben

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2iy7Xvx.
Wohlleben draws on decades of experience as a forester in Germany’s Eifel mountains for this eye-opening book. He starts with wise words for those entering a forest: “Slow down, breathe deep and look around.”
Book description from Google Books:
In “The Hidden Life of Trees”, Peter Wohlleben shares his deep love of woods and forests and explains the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in the woodland and the amazing scientific processes behind the wonders of which we are blissfully unaware. Much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. As a result of such interactions, trees in a family or community are protected and can live to be very old. In contrast, solitary trees, like street kids, have a tough time of it and in most cases die much earlier than those in a group. Drawing on groundbreaking new discoveries, Wohlleben presents the science behind the secret
The book is rated 4.07/5 at goodreads.com, from 8088 ratings. See 1363 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ga4xAS.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2h5C90O.

A sport book recommendation: Off Speed: Baseball, Pitching, and the Art of Deception by Terry McDermott

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2iKEFdq.
He covers a lot of ground in less than 200 pages, but there is little wasted ink. There are statistics enough for any baseball geek, but those are balanced against theories that propose a player’s success and or failure can be attributed to the simple odds year-to-year of the ball finding or not finding the bat and or open areas on the field.
Book description from Google Books:
The lively and fascinating story of baseball’s 150-year hunt for the perfect pitchIn August 2012, Felix Hernandez of the Seattle Mariners pitched a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays in what Terry McDermott calls “one of the greatest exhibitions of off-speed pitches ever put on.” For McDermott, a lifelong fan and student of baseball, the extraordinary events of that afternoon inspired this incisive meditation on the art of pitching.Within the framework of Hernandez’s historic achievement, Off Speed provides a vibrant narrative of the history and evolution of pitching, combining baseball’s rich tradition of folklore with the wealth of new metrics from a growing legion of statisticians who are transforming the way we think about the game. Off Speed is also the personal story of a fan’s steadfast devotion, first kindled in McDermott by his father at the local diamond in small-town Iowa and now carried forward with the same passion by his own daughters.Approaching his subject with the love every fan brings to the park and the expertise of a probing journalist, McDermott explores with irrepressible curiosity the science and the romance of baseball.
The book is rated 3.89/5 at goodreads.com, from 81 ratings. See 16 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2iNWvfk.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2iL7HcX.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A sport book recommendation: A Natural History of the Hedgerow: And Ditches, Dykes and Dry Stone Walls by John Wright

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2ixUgNm.
This illustrated survey is historically detailed, enriched by the author’s deep knowledge of British landscapes and natural history.
Book description from Google Books:
It is difficult to think of a more quintessential symbol of the British countryside than the British Hedgerow, bursting with blackberries, hazelnuts and sloes, and home to oak and ash, field mice and butterflies. But as much as we might dream about foraging for mushrooms or collecting wayside nettles for soup, most of us are unaware of quite how profoundly hedgerows have shaped the history of our landscape and our species. One of Britain’s best known naturalists, John Wright introduces us to the natural and cultural history of hedges (as well as ditches, dykes and dry stone walls) – from the arrival of the first settlers in the British Isles to the modern day, when we have finally begun to recognise the importance of these unique ecosystems. His intimate knowledge of the countryside and its inhabitants brings this guide to life, whether discussing the skills and craft of hedge maintenance or the rich variety of animals who call them home. Informative, practical, entertaining and richly illustrated in colour throughout, A Natural History of the Hedgerow is a book to stuff into your pocket for country walks in every season, or to savour in winter before a roaring fire.
The book is rated 3.71/5 at goodreads.com, from 31 ratings. See 5 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ixTnEm.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2ixTqjw.

A sport book recommendation: Off Speed: Baseball, Pitching, and the Art of Deception by Terry McDermott

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2iKEFdq.
He covers a lot of ground in less than 200 pages, but there is little wasted ink. There are statistics enough for any baseball geek, but those are balanced against theories that propose a player’s success and or failure can be attributed to the simple odds year-to-year of the ball finding or not finding the bat and or open areas on the field.
Book description from Google Books:
The lively and fascinating story of baseball’s 150-year hunt for the perfect pitchIn August 2012, Felix Hernandez of the Seattle Mariners pitched a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays in what Terry McDermott calls “one of the greatest exhibitions of off-speed pitches ever put on.” For McDermott, a lifelong fan and student of baseball, the extraordinary events of that afternoon inspired this incisive meditation on the art of pitching.Within the framework of Hernandez’s historic achievement, Off Speed provides a vibrant narrative of the history and evolution of pitching, combining baseball’s rich tradition of folklore with the wealth of new metrics from a growing legion of statisticians who are transforming the way we think about the game. Off Speed is also the personal story of a fan’s steadfast devotion, first kindled in McDermott by his father at the local diamond in small-town Iowa and now carried forward with the same passion by his own daughters.Approaching his subject with the love every fan brings to the park and the expertise of a probing journalist, McDermott explores with irrepressible curiosity the science and the romance of baseball.
The book is rated 3.89/5 at goodreads.com, from 81 ratings. See 16 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2iNWvfk.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2iL7HcX.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A sport book recommendation: The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2ha6VWm.
This is a profound interrogation of freedom and fate, as well as a fascinating portrait of a vanished time, written in prose as clear and washed clean as the world after a storm.
Book description from Google Books:
Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize 2017 Nobody can leave an island. An island is a cosmos in a nutshell, where the stars slumber in the grass beneath the snow. But occasionally someone tries . . . Ingrid Barr�y is born on an island that bears her name – a holdfast for a single family, their livestock, their crops, their hopes and dreams. Her father dreams of building a quay that will connect them to the mainland, but closer ties to the wider world come at a price. Her mother has her own dreams – more children, a smaller island, a different life – and there is one question Ingrid must never ask her. Island life is hard, a living scratched from the dirt or trawled from the sea, so when Ingrid comes of age, she is sent to the mainland to work for one of the wealthy families on the coast. But Norway too is waking up to a wider world, a modern world that is capricious and can be cruel. Tragedy strikes, and Ingrid must fight to protect the home she thought she had left behind. Translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett and Don Shaw
The book is rated 4.04/5 at goodreads.com, from 1090 ratings. See 133 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2hbi5u3.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2iAmDdR.

A sport book recommendation: Ernest Hemingway: A Biography by Mary V. Dearborn

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2hbs2aO.
She engages the reader with both the well-known stories and references to his writings, as well as many little known facts. This is a worthy biography.
Book description from Google Books:
The first full biography of Ernest Hemingway in more than fifteen years; the first to draw upon a wide array of never-before-used material; the first written by a woman, from the widely acclaimed biographer of Norman Mailer, Peggy Guggenheim, Henry Miller, and Louise Bryant. A revelatory look into the life and work of Ernest Hemingway, considered in his time to be the greatest living American novelist and short-story writer, winner of the 1953 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. Mary Dearborn’s new biography gives the richest and most nuanced portrait to date of this complex, enigmatically unique American artist, whose same uncontrollable demons that inspired and drove him throughout his life undid him at the end, and whose seven novels and six-short story collections informed–and are still informing–fiction writing generations after his death.
The book is rated 4.03/5 at goodreads.com, from 132 ratings. See 29 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2iEGicn.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2iEGiJp.

A sport book recommendation: The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2ha6VWm.
This is a profound interrogation of freedom and fate, as well as a fascinating portrait of a vanished time, written in prose as clear and washed clean as the world after a storm.
Book description from Google Books:
Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize 2017 Nobody can leave an island. An island is a cosmos in a nutshell, where the stars slumber in the grass beneath the snow. But occasionally someone tries . . . Ingrid Barr�y is born on an island that bears her name – a holdfast for a single family, their livestock, their crops, their hopes and dreams. Her father dreams of building a quay that will connect them to the mainland, but closer ties to the wider world come at a price. Her mother has her own dreams – more children, a smaller island, a different life – and there is one question Ingrid must never ask her. Island life is hard, a living scratched from the dirt or trawled from the sea, so when Ingrid comes of age, she is sent to the mainland to work for one of the wealthy families on the coast. But Norway too is waking up to a wider world, a modern world that is capricious and can be cruel. Tragedy strikes, and Ingrid must fight to protect the home she thought she had left behind. Translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett and Don Shaw
The book is rated 4.04/5 at goodreads.com, from 1088 ratings. See 133 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2hbi5u3.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2iAmDdR.

A sport book recommendation: The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries From a Secret World by Peter Wohlleben

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2iy7Xvx.
Wohlleben draws on decades of experience as a forester in Germany’s Eifel mountains for this eye-opening book. He starts with wise words for those entering a forest: “Slow down, breathe deep and look around.”
Book description from Google Books:
In “The Hidden Life of Trees”, Peter Wohlleben shares his deep love of woods and forests and explains the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in the woodland and the amazing scientific processes behind the wonders of which we are blissfully unaware. Much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. As a result of such interactions, trees in a family or community are protected and can live to be very old. In contrast, solitary trees, like street kids, have a tough time of it and in most cases die much earlier than those in a group. Drawing on groundbreaking new discoveries, Wohlleben presents the science behind the secret
The book is rated 4.07/5 at goodreads.com, from 7911 ratings. See 1334 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ga4xAS.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2h5C90O.

A sport book recommendation: The Hot Shot by Kristen Callihan

A critic review (source Dear Author) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2xQ386m.
I liked that not everything was tied up with a neat bow at the end. There are some things which will work themselves out one way or another in Finn’s and Chess’s future. I didn’t need to know about them to be sure of their HEA.
Book description from amazon.com:
First we were friends. Then we were roommates. Now I want more…What can I say about Chess Copper? The woman is capable of bringing me to my knees. I know this about five minutes after getting naked for her.No one is more surprised than me. The prickly photographer my team hired to shoot our annual charity calendar isn’t my usual type. She’s defense to my offense, a challenge at every turn. But when I’m with her, all the regrets and darkness goes away. She makes life fun. I want to know Chess, be close to her. Which is a bad idea.Chess is looking for a relationship. I’ve never given a woman more than one night. But when fate leaves Chess without a home, I step up and offer her mine. We’re roommates now. Friends without benefits. But it’s getting harder to keep our hands off each other. And the longer we live together the more I realize she’s becoming my everything.Trick is… Now that I’ve made her believe I’m a bad bet, how do I convince her to give this player a true shot at forever?
The book is rated 4.23/5 at goodreads.com, from 6980 ratings. See 807 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2yz3Nge.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2yzBLBn.

A sport book recommendation: A Champion’s Heart (Born to Win Men) (Volume 1) by Piper Huguley

A critic review (source Dear Author) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2xNu2vL.
Your books may be inspirational romances, but I appreciate so much that they aren’t preachy. Instead the characters’ faith feels organic to their background and right for their journeys.
Book description from Google Books:
1935. Champion Bates left poky old Winslow, Georgia when he was seventeen years old. He had promised to elope with his childhood sweetheart, but pressured by other influences, he took an earlier train leaving his Delie behind. The pain at leaving her behind has tormented him for the seven years he fought as a ham and egg boxer, trying to make himself worthy of her. He had no chance for the big time until now. He has a fight with a contender boxer–a white man. However, he has been told more fighting will possibly blind him. Back in Winslow, Cordelia “Delie” Bledsoe is out of luck. A teacher in the local school, she has the care of several children who have been abandoned by their parents. She’s offered $200 to take the children out of Georgia. She wants to take them to her family in Pittsburgh to live on a family farm, but Champion Bates shows up, insistent on helping her. She does not want to trust her old love, but has little choice. Champion wants to redeem himself with his former sweetheart and doesn’t expect much, but the hair and eyes of one of Delie’s young children tugs at his heart. In this story of sacrifice, Champ and Delie struggle to learn about love and both must grow A Champion’s Heart.
The book is rated 4.42/5 at goodreads.com, from 12 ratings. See 6 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2ywqQrS.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: .