A sport book recommendation: Linescapes: Remapping and Reconnecting Britain’s Fragmented Wildlife by Hugh Warwick

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CEYs7w.
Warwick is a generous companion and never a prickly know-it-all, even as he presents his manifesto for reconnection.
Book description from Google Books:
Selected as a Book of the Year 2017 in the Guardian ‘This is a beautifully crafted book . . . timely and essential reading’ Kathy Willis, Director of Science, Kew Gardens It is rare to find a landscape untouched by our lines – the hedges, walls, ditches and dykes built to enclose and separate; and the green lanes, roads, canals, railways and power lines, designed to connect. This vast network of lines has transformed our landscape. In Linescapes, Hugh Warwick unravels the far-reaching ecological consequences of the lines we have drawn: as our lives and our land were being fenced in and threaded together, so wildlife habitats have been cut into ever smaller, and increasingly unviable, fragments. Hugh Warwick has travelled across the country to explore this linescape from the perspective of our wildlife and to understand how, with a manifesto for reconnection, we can help our flora and fauna to flourish. Linescapes offers a fresh and bracing perspective on Britain’s countryside, one that proposes a challenge and gives ground for hope; for while nature does not tend to straight lines and discrete borders, our lines can and do contain a real potential for wildness and for wildlife.
The book is rated 4.40/5 at goodreads.com, from 5 ratings. See 2 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2CcyNlL.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Cdd6BY.

A sport book recommendation: Surfing with Sartre: An Aquatic Inquiry into a Life of Meaning by Aaron James

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2Dfl0uE.
Ultimately, it’s as concerned with peace, fulfillment, and humanity’s future as it is about the spray of salty surf on a summer’s day. In fact, the two are the same. And his departing lesson is profound in its clarity: Surfing — like life — should be a thing of both pleasure and meaning.
Book description from Google Books:
From the bestselling author of Assholes: A Theory, a book that—in the tradition of Shopclass as Soulcraft, Barbarian Days and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance—uses the experience and the ethos of surfing to explore key concepts in philosophy. The existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre once declared “the ideal limit of aquatic sports . . . is waterskiing.” The avid surfer and lavishly credentialed academic philosopher Aaron James vigorously disagrees, and in Surfing with Sartre he intends to expound the thinking surfer’s view of the matter, in the process elucidating such philosophical categories as freedom, being, phenomenology, morality, epistemology, and even the emerging values of what he terms “leisure capitalism.” In developing his unique surfer-philosophical worldview, he draws from his own experience of surfing and from surf culture and lingo, and includes many relevant details from the lives of the philosophers, from Aristotle to Wittgenstein, with whose thought he engages. In the process, he’ll speak to readers in search of personal and social meaning in our current anxious moment, by way of doing real, authentic philosophy.
The book is rated 3.70/5 at goodreads.com, from 47 ratings. See 15 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C5oP6d.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C5p9lr.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A sport book recommendation: The Explorer by Katherine Rundell

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2C4SZH0.
On one level it’s a gripping story of survival and the tenacity of the human spirit against all odds, but it’s also a hymn to hope, love and courage, delivered with all the warmth and wisdom we’ve come to expect from one of our most talented writers for children.
Book description from Google Books:
Parents’ Choice Recommended From Boston Globe–Horn Book Award winner Katherine Rundell comes an exciting new novel about a group of kids who must survive in the Amazon after their plane crashes.Fred, Con, Lila, and Max are on their way back to England from Manaus when the plane they’re on crashes and the pilot dies upon landing. For days they survive alone, until Fred finds a map that leads them to a ruined city, and to a secret.
The book is rated 4.24/5 at goodreads.com, from 358 ratings. See 110 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C60VI5.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C5SxIn.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A sport book recommendation: Surfing with Sartre: An Aquatic Inquiry into a Life of Meaning by Aaron James

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2Dfl0uE.
Ultimately, it’s as concerned with peace, fulfillment, and humanity’s future as it is about the spray of salty surf on a summer’s day. In fact, the two are the same. And his departing lesson is profound in its clarity: Surfing — like life — should be a thing of both pleasure and meaning.
Book description from Google Books:
From the bestselling author of Assholes: A Theory, a book that—in the tradition of Shopclass as Soulcraft, Barbarian Days and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance—uses the experience and the ethos of surfing to explore key concepts in philosophy. The existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre once declared “the ideal limit of aquatic sports . . . is waterskiing.” The avid surfer and lavishly credentialed academic philosopher Aaron James vigorously disagrees, and in Surfing with Sartre he intends to expound the thinking surfer’s view of the matter, in the process elucidating such philosophical categories as freedom, being, phenomenology, morality, epistemology, and even the emerging values of what he terms “leisure capitalism.” In developing his unique surfer-philosophical worldview, he draws from his own experience of surfing and from surf culture and lingo, and includes many relevant details from the lives of the philosophers, from Aristotle to Wittgenstein, with whose thought he engages. In the process, he’ll speak to readers in search of personal and social meaning in our current anxious moment, by way of doing real, authentic philosophy.
The book is rated 3.66/5 at goodreads.com, from 41 ratings. See 14 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C5oP6d.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C5p9lr.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A sport book recommendation: 42 Faith: The Rest of the Jackie Robinson Story by Ed Henry

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2D8CbOy.
Mr. Henry’s intriguing book has added an important new chapter in Jackie Robinson’s life and career. We now understand the faith that family, friends and fans put in his God-given abilities provided additional strength to his own commitment to faith.
Book description from Google Books:
New York Times Bestseller Jackie Robinson, Branch Rickey, and the hidden hand of God that changed history Journalist and baseball lover Ed Henry reveals for the first time the backstory of faith that guided Jackie Robinson into not only the baseball record books but the annals of civil rights advancement as well. Through recently discovered sermons, interviews with Robinson’s family and friends, and even an unpublished book by the player himself, Henry details a side of Jackie’s humanity that few have taken the time to see. Branch Rickey, the famed owner who risked it all by signing Jackie to his first contract, is also shown as a complex individual who wanted nothing more than to make his God-fearing mother proud of him. Few know the level at which Rickey struggled with his decision, only moving forward after a private meeting with a minister he’d just met. It turns out Rickey was not as certain about signing Robinson as historians have always assumed. With many baseball stories to enthrall even the most ardent enthusiast, 42 Faith also digs deep into why Jackie was the man he was and what both drove him and challenged him after his retirement. From his early years before baseball, to his time with Rickey and the Dodgers, to his failing health in his final years, we see a man of faith that few have recognized. This book will add a whole new dimension to Robinson’s already awe-inspiring legacy. Yes, Jackie and Branch are both still heroes long after their deaths. Now, we learn more fully than ever before, there was an assist from God too.
The book is rated 4.18/5 at goodreads.com, from 123 ratings. See 22 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C1rrSU.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C1rFJK.

A sport book recommendation: Long Road from Jarrow: A journey through Britain then and now by Stuart Maconie

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2C0PMI8.
…Maconie’s book is not only a heartfelt tribute to Wilkinson and the marchers, but a reaffirmation of the role of the personal within the political, and a rallying call for anyone stirred by the story of Jarrow.
Book description from Google Books:
Three and half weeks. Three hundred miles. I saw roaring arterial highway and silent lanes, candlelit cathedrals and angry men in bad pubs. The Britain of 1936 was a land of beef paste sandwiches and drill halls. Now we are nation of vaping and nail salons, pulled pork and salted caramel.In the autumn of 1936, some 200 men from the Tyneside town of Jarrow marched 300 miles to London in protest against the destruction of their towns and industries. Precisely 80 years on, Stuart Maconie, walks from north to south retracing the route of the emblematic Jarrow Crusade. Travelling down the country’s spine, Maconie moves through a land that is, in some ways, very much the same as the England of the 30s with its political turbulence, austerity, north/south divide, food banks and of course, football mania. Yet in other ways, it is completely unrecognisable. Maconie visits the great cities as well as the sleepy hamlets, quiet lanes and roaring motorways. He meets those with stories to tell and whose voices build a funny, complex and entertaining tale of Britain, then and now.
The book is rated 4.32/5 at goodreads.com, from 76 ratings. See 29 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D5Ryaw.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C0NVmP.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A sport book recommendation: The Explorer by Katherine Rundell

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2C4SZH0.
On one level it’s a gripping story of survival and the tenacity of the human spirit against all odds, but it’s also a hymn to hope, love and courage, delivered with all the warmth and wisdom we’ve come to expect from one of our most talented writers for children.
Book description from Google Books:
Parents’ Choice Recommended From Boston Globe–Horn Book Award winner Katherine Rundell comes an exciting new novel about a group of kids who must survive in the Amazon after their plane crashes.Fred, Con, Lila, and Max are on their way back to England from Manaus when the plane they’re on crashes and the pilot dies upon landing. For days they survive alone, until Fred finds a map that leads them to a ruined city, and to a secret.
The book is rated 4.24/5 at goodreads.com, from 355 ratings. See 109 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2C60VI5.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2C5SxIn.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A sport book recommendation: Shark Drunk: The Art of Catching a Large Shark from a Tiny Rubber Dinghy in a Big Ocean by Morten Stroksnes

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CZlS6o.
Its beauty, undemanding science and soothing, musing qualities have made the book a bestseller in Norway and beyond. In vexed times, gently informative escapism is a winner for publishers and a refuge for readers.
Book description from Google Books:
A salty story of friendship, adventure, and the explosive life that teems beneath the ocean The Lofoten archipelago, just North of the Arctic Circle, is a place of unsurpassed beauty–the skyline spikes with dramatic peaks; the radiant greens and purples of the Northern Lights follow summers where the sun never sets. It’s a place of small villages, where the art of fishing, though evolving, is still practiced in traditional ways. Beneath the great depths surrounding these islands lurks the infamous Greenland shark. At twenty-four feet in length and weighing more than a ton, it is truly a beast to behold. But the shark is not known just for its size: Its meat contains a toxin that, when consumed, has been known to make people drunk and hallucinatory. Shark Drunk is the true story of two friends, the author and the eccentric artist Hugo Aasjord, as they embark on a wild pursuit of the famed creature–all from a tiny rubber boat. Together they tackle existential questions and encounter the world’s most powerful maelstrom as they attempt to understand the ocean from every possible angle, drawing on poetry, science, history, ecology, mythology, and their own–sometimes intoxicated–observations, meanwhile pursuing the elusive Greenland shark. By turns thrilling, wise, and hilarious, Shark Drunk is a celebration of adventure, marine life, and, above all, friendship. Winner of the Norwegian Brage Prize 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Critics’ Prize for Literature 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Reine Ord Prize at Lofoten International Literature Festival 2016
The book is rated 4.11/5 at goodreads.com, from 830 ratings. See 129 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D2RvvR.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2BSji2J.

A sport book recommendation: Shark Drunk: The Art of Catching a Large Shark from a Tiny Rubber Dinghy in a Big Ocean by Morten Stroksnes

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CZlS6o.
Its beauty, undemanding science and soothing, musing qualities have made the book a bestseller in Norway and beyond. In vexed times, gently informative escapism is a winner for publishers and a refuge for readers.
Book description from Google Books:
A salty story of friendship, adventure, and the explosive life that teems beneath the ocean The Lofoten archipelago, just North of the Arctic Circle, is a place of unsurpassed beauty–the skyline spikes with dramatic peaks; the radiant greens and purples of the Northern Lights follow summers where the sun never sets. It’s a place of small villages, where the art of fishing, though evolving, is still practiced in traditional ways. Beneath the great depths surrounding these islands lurks the infamous Greenland shark. At twenty-four feet in length and weighing more than a ton, it is truly a beast to behold. But the shark is not known just for its size: Its meat contains a toxin that, when consumed, has been known to make people drunk and hallucinatory. Shark Drunk is the true story of two friends, the author and the eccentric artist Hugo Aasjord, as they embark on a wild pursuit of the famed creature–all from a tiny rubber boat. Together they tackle existential questions and encounter the world’s most powerful maelstrom as they attempt to understand the ocean from every possible angle, drawing on poetry, science, history, ecology, mythology, and their own–sometimes intoxicated–observations, meanwhile pursuing the elusive Greenland shark. By turns thrilling, wise, and hilarious, Shark Drunk is a celebration of adventure, marine life, and, above all, friendship. Winner of the Norwegian Brage Prize 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Critics’ Prize for Literature 2015 Winner of the Norwegian Reine Ord Prize at Lofoten International Literature Festival 2016
The book is rated 4.11/5 at goodreads.com, from 830 ratings. See 129 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D2RvvR.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2BSji2J.

A sport book recommendation: Hidden Hearts by Olivia Dade

A critic review (source Dear Author) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2j8brGr.
So yay, that Mary’s a librarian as I love librarians, their decisions about serious “not solved in a 5 minute conversation” problems are thought out, come from within, and are made thinking of themselves as well as each other. Oh and the email exchange chapter was an added bonus. Loved that too.
Book description from amazon.com:
AN ADMIRER WITH A SECRET . . .Mary Higgs could be the poster girl for the buttoned-up librarian. She follows the rules. Stays ʼtil closing. Her kindness and dedication to her patrons are legendary. But those patrons have no idea what she’s typing to the mysterious shut-in who emailed the library three months ago . . .A year ago, Miles O’Connor was a gleaming, ab-sational star of the small screen. Then came the accident. Now he’s a wounded recluse with a pizza habit and fears so unshakable that only the thought of losing Mary to an online date could lure him out of his cabin.Soon their email rapport has turned into weekends on the couch, watching tearjerkers and driving each other insane with red-hot makeout sessions. But as their desire grows and their horizons expand, the life that brought them together might not be enough for either of them . . .”Love is never out of reach for the librarians of the Nice County Library System . . . Sarah’s charm and humor are perfectly suited to a beach read.” –Publishers Weekly on Ready to Fall
The book is rated 3.73/5 at goodreads.com, from 84 ratings. See 35 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2BtPxUK.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2BtQLPT.