A technology book recommendation: The Weapon Wizards: How Israel Became a High-Tech Military Superpower by Yaakov Katz

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2iyP4c1.
With many of Israel’s military technological innovations employed by its American military counterparts (and with the U.S. military industry also involved in joint development programs), this book offers welcome insights into welcome achievements.
Book description from Google Books:
“A lively account of Israel’s evolving military prowess…if The Weapon Wizards were a novel, it would be one written by Horatio Alger; if it were a biblical allegory, it would be the story of David and Goliath.” —The New York Times Book ReviewFrom drones to satellites, missile defense systems to cyber warfare, Israel is leading the world when it comes to new technology being deployed on the modern battlefield. The Weapon Wizards shows how this tiny nation of 8 million learned to adapt to the changes in warfare and in the defense industry and become the new prototype of a 21st century superpower, not in size, but rather in innovation and efficiency—and as a result of its long war experience. Sitting on the front lines of how wars are fought in the 21st century, Israel has developed in its arms trade new weapons and retrofitted old ones so they remain effective, relevant, and deadly on a constantly-changing battlefield. While other countries begin to prepare for these challenges, they are looking to Israel—and specifically its weapons—for guidance. Israel is, in effect, a laboratory for the rest of the world. How did Israel do it? And what are the military and geopolitical implications of these developments? These are some of the key questions Yaakov Katz and Amir Bohbot address. Drawing on a vast amount of research, and unparalleled access to the Israeli defense establishment, this book is a report directly from the front lines.
The book is rated 4.26/5 at goodreads.com, from 144 ratings. See 19 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2iwB9TC.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2h6x7kw.

A technology book recommendation: The Weapon Wizards: How Israel Became a High-Tech Military Superpower by Yaakov Katz

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2iyP4c1.
With many of Israel’s military technological innovations employed by its American military counterparts (and with the U.S. military industry also involved in joint development programs), this book offers welcome insights into welcome achievements.
Book description from Google Books:
“A lively account of Israel’s evolving military prowess…if The Weapon Wizards were a novel, it would be one written by Horatio Alger; if it were a biblical allegory, it would be the story of David and Goliath.” —The New York Times Book ReviewFrom drones to satellites, missile defense systems to cyber warfare, Israel is leading the world when it comes to new technology being deployed on the modern battlefield. The Weapon Wizards shows how this tiny nation of 8 million learned to adapt to the changes in warfare and in the defense industry and become the new prototype of a 21st century superpower, not in size, but rather in innovation and efficiency—and as a result of its long war experience. Sitting on the front lines of how wars are fought in the 21st century, Israel has developed in its arms trade new weapons and retrofitted old ones so they remain effective, relevant, and deadly on a constantly-changing battlefield. While other countries begin to prepare for these challenges, they are looking to Israel—and specifically its weapons—for guidance. Israel is, in effect, a laboratory for the rest of the world. How did Israel do it? And what are the military and geopolitical implications of these developments? These are some of the key questions Yaakov Katz and Amir Bohbot address. Drawing on a vast amount of research, and unparalleled access to the Israeli defense establishment, this book is a report directly from the front lines.
The book is rated 4.26/5 at goodreads.com, from 144 ratings. See 19 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2iwB9TC.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2h6x7kw.

A technology book recommendation: Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy by Jonathan Taplin

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2xJ3Nqm.
It’s a sign of how slavish the world built by Silicon Valley has become. Taplin’s own experience with Ohanian should show us just how dangerous it is to be dependent on the goodwill of spoiled brats.
Book description from Google Books:
A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice Longlisted for Financial Times/McKinsey Business Book of the Year 2017 A stinging polemic that traces the destructive monopolization of the Internet by Google, Facebook and Amazon, and that proposes a new future for musicians, journalists, authors and filmmakers in the digital age.Move Fast and Break Things is the riveting account of a small group of libertarian entrepreneurs who in the 1990s began to hijack the original decentralized vision of the Internet, in the process creating three monopoly firms–Facebook, Amazon, and Google–that now determine the future of the music, film, television, publishing and news industries.Jonathan Taplin offers a succinct and powerful history of how online life began to be shaped around the values of the men who founded these companies, including Peter Thiel and Larry Page: overlooking piracy of books, music, and film while hiding behind opaque business practices and subordinating the privacy of individual users in order to create the surveillance-marketing monoculture in which we now live. The enormous profits that have come with this concentration of power tell their own story. Since 2001, newspaper and music revenues have fallen by 70 percent; book publishing, film, and television profits have also fallen dramatically. Revenues at Google in this same period grew from $400 million to $74.5 billion. Today, Google’s YouTube controls 60 percent of all streaming-audio business but pay for only 11 percent of the total streaming-audio revenues artists receive. More creative content is being consumed than ever before, but less revenue is flowing to the creators and owners of that content.With the reallocation of money to monopoly platforms comes a shift in power. Google, Facebook, and Amazon now enjoy political influence on par with Big Oil and Big Pharma, which in part explains how such a tremendous shift in revenues from artists to platforms could have been achieved and why it has gone unchallenged for so long.The stakes here go far beyond the livelihood of any one musician or journalist. As Taplin observes, the fact that more and more Americans receive their news, as well as music and other forms of entertainment, from a small group of companies poses a real threat to democracy. Move Fast and Break Things offers a vital, forward-thinking prescription for how artists can reclaim their audiences using knowledge of the past and a determination to work together. Using his own half-century career as a music and film producer and early pioneer of streaming video online, Taplin offers new ways to think about the design of the World Wide Web and specifically the way we live with the firms that dominate it.
The book is rated 3.66/5 at goodreads.com, from 312 ratings. See 65 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2yrJmBI.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2yDPI1i.

A technology book recommendation: We, Robots: Staying Human in the Age of Big Data by Curtis White

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/1ViP4YU.
Discursive, scholarly, and crackling with intensity, We, Robots works best as a jolt of self-awareness, a circuit breaker for the narratives that we often unconsciously allow our lives to follow…
Book description from Google Books:
In the tradition of Jaron Lanier s “You Are Not a Gadget,” a rousing, sharply argued and, yes, inspiring! reckoning with our blind faith in technology Can technology solve all our problems? Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, many of our most famous journalists, pundits, and economists seem to think so. According to them, intelligent machines and big data will free us from work, educate our children, transform our environment, and even make religion more user-friendly. This is the story they re telling us: that we should stop worrying and love our robot future. But just because you tell a story over and over again doesn t make it true. Curtis White, one of our most brilliant and perceptive social critics, knows all about the danger of a seductive story, and in “We, Robots,” he tangles with the so-called thinkers who are convinced that the future is rose-colored and robotically enhanced. With tremendous erudition and a punchy wit, White argues that we must be skeptical of anyone who tries to sell us on technological inevitability. And he gives us an alternative set of stories: taking inspiration from artists as disparate as Sufjan Stevens, Lars von Trier, and Francois Rabelais, White shows us that by looking to art, we can imagine a different kind of future. No robots required.”
The book is rated 3.34/5 at goodreads.com, from 58 ratings. See 11 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1ViP4Z2.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2yAwMAr.

A technology book recommendation: The Boy Who Could Change the World: The Writings of Aaron Swartz by Aaron Swartz

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1UX8AgX.
One thing the writings collected here do makes clear is that he lived that ethos as completely as anyone possibly could, in exploring the world for as much time as he was allowed.
Book description from Google Books:
In his too-short life, Aaron Swartz reshaped the Internet, questioned our assumptions about intellectual property, and touched all of us in ways that we may not even realize. His tragic suicide in 2013 at the age of twenty-six after being aggressively prosecuted for copyright infringement shocked the nation and the world. Here for the first time in print is revealed the quintessential Aaron Swartz: besides being a technical genius and a passionate activist, he was also an insightful, compelling, and cutting essayist. With a technical understanding of the Internet and of intellectual property law surpassing that of many seasoned professionals, he wrote thoughtfully and humorously about intellectual property, copyright, and the architecture of the Internet. He wrote as well about unexpected topics such as pop culture, politics both electoral and idealistic, dieting, and lifehacking. Including three in-depth and previously unpublished essays about education, governance, and cities,The Boy Who Could Change the World contains the life’s work of one of the most original minds of our time.
The book is rated 4.23/5 at goodreads.com, from 221 ratings. See 35 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/235Lx5d.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2xRPm3l.

A technology book recommendation: Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble by Dan Lyons

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2cyFBj1.
None of this will be new to anyone who read even a couple of pieces about the first Internet bubble. The Ping-Pong tables, the snacks, the beanbag chairs — it’s all very familiar. Lyons doesn’t get below the surface of the place, or get to know anyone…
Book description from Google Books:
INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “Disrupted by Dan Lyons is the best book about Silicon Valley today.”—Los Angeles Times”Hysterical.”—Kara Swisher, Recode “Wildly entertaining.”—Ashlee Vance, New York Times-bestselling author of Elon MuskFor twenty-five years Dan Lyons was a magazine writer at the top of his profession–until one Friday morning when he received a phone call: Poof. His job no longer existed. “I think they just want to hire younger people,” his boss at Newsweek told him. Fifty years old and with a wife and two young kids, Dan was, in a word, screwed. Then an idea hit. Dan had long reported on Silicon Valley and the tech explosion. Why not join it? HubSpot, a Boston start-up, was flush with $100 million in venture capital. They offered Dan a pile of stock options for the vague role of “marketing fellow.” What could go wrong? HubSpotters were true believers: They were making the world a better place … by selling email spam. The office vibe was frat house meets cult compound: The party began at four thirty on Friday and lasted well into the night; “shower pods” became hook-up dens; a push-up club met at noon in the lobby, while nearby, in the “content factory,” Nerf gun fights raged. Groups went on “walking meetings,” and Dan’s absentee boss sent cryptic emails about employees who had “graduated” (read: been fired). In the middle of all this was Dan, exactly twice the age of the average HubSpot employee, and literally old enough to be the father of most of his co-workers, sitting at his desk on his bouncy-ball “chair.”Mixed in with Lyons’s uproarious tale of his rise and fall at Hubspot is a trenchant analysis of the start-up world, a de facto conspiracy between those who start companies and those who fund them, a world where bad ideas are rewarded with hefty investments, where companies blow money lavishing perks on their post-collegiate workforces, and where everybody is trying to hang on just long enough to reach an IPO and cash out. With a cast of characters that includes devilish angel investors, fad-chasing venture capitalists, entrepreneurs and “wantrapreneurs,” bloggers and brogrammers, social climbers and sociopaths, Disrupted is a gripping and definitive account of life in the (second) tech bubble.
The book is rated 3.90/5 at goodreads.com, from 9231 ratings. See 986 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1Xqt3La.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2u6kdaw.

A technology book recommendation: Switch: How Solar, Storage and New Tech Means Cheap Power for All by Chris Goodall

A critic review (source Financial Times) can be read at: http://on.ft.com/2awJF2c.
In Goodall’s view this, coupled with other technological advances in managing demand for electricity, heralds an unstoppable switch away from fossil fuels towards green power. He may be wrong but for anyone interested in the future of energy, this book is well worth reading.
Book description from Google Books:
How will the world be powered in ten years’ time? Not by fossil fuels. Energy experts are all saying the same thing: solar photovoltaics (PV) is our future. Reports from universities, investment banks, international institutions and large investors agree. It’s not about whether the switch from fossil fuels to solar power will happen, but when. Solar panels are being made that will last longer than ever hoped; investors are seeing the benefits of the long-term rewards provided by investing in solar; in the Middle East, a contractor can now offer solar-powered electricity far cheaper than that of a coal-fired power station. The Switch tracks the transition away from coal, oil and gas to a world in which the limitless energy of the sun provides much of the energy the 10 billion people of this planet will need. It examines both the solar future and how we will get there, and the ways in which we will provide stored power when the sun isn’t shining. We learn about artificial photosynthesis from a start-up in the US that is making petrol from just CO2 and sunlight; ideas on energy storage are drawn from a company in Germany that makes batteries for homes; in the UK, a small company in Swindon has the story of wind turbines; and in Switzerland, a developer shows how we can use hydrogen to make ‘renewable’ natural gas for heating. Told through the stories of entrepreneurs, inventors and scientists from around the world, and using the latest research and studies, The Switch provides a positive solution to the climate change crisis, and looks to a brighter future ahead.
The book is rated 4.23/5 at goodreads.com, from 53 ratings. See 3 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2b3qCty.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2yzJpeY.

A technology book recommendation: The Grid: The Fraying Wires Between Americans and Our Energy Future by Gretchen Bakke Ph.D.

A critic review (source National Post arts) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2cMSMzM.
For those reading these words on a computer screen or by the glow of an electric lamp, The Grid throws a welcome light onto the the systems of power generation and distribution that make our society possible.
Book description from Google Books:
America’s electrical grid, an engineering triumph of the twentieth century, is turning out to be a poor fit for the present. It’s not just that the grid has grown old and is now in dire need of basic repair. Today, as we invest great hope in new energy sources–solar, wind, and other alternatives–the grid is what stands most firmly in the way of a brighter energy future. If we hope to realize this future, we need to re-imagine the grid according to twenty-first-century values. It’s a project which forces visionaries to work with bureaucrats, legislators with storm-flattened communities, moneymen with hippies, and the left with the right. And though it might not yet be obvious, this revolution is already well under way.Cultural anthropologist Gretchen Bakke unveils the many facets of America’s energy infrastructure, its most dynamic moments and its most stable ones, and its essential role in personal and national life. The grid, she argues, is an essentially American artifact, one which developed with us: a product of bold expansion, the occasional foolhardy vision, some genius technologies, and constant improvisation. Most of all, her focus is on how Americans are changing the grid right now, sometimes with gumption and big dreams and sometimes with legislation or the brandishing of guns.The Grid tells–entertainingly, perceptively–the story of what has been called “the largest machine in the world”: its fascinating history, its problematic present, and its potential role in a brighter, cleaner future.
The book is rated 3.91/5 at goodreads.com, from 924 ratings. See 155 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2cMT6hW.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tjJwWR.

A technology book recommendation: #AskGaryVee: One Entrepreneur’s Take on Leadership, Social Media, and Self-Awareness by Gary Vaynerchuk

A critic review (source Forbes) can be read at: http://bit.ly/228nFvi.
…if a good kick in the ass, from an innovative entrepreneur, who’s hustling what he’s been preaching for ten years, is what you’re looking for. You’re gonna love it.
Book description from Google Books:
The New York Times bestselling author draws from his popular show #AskGaryVee to offer surprising, often outrageous, and imminently useful and honest answers to everything you’ve ever wanted to know—and more—about navigating the new world.Gary Vaynerchuk—the inspiring and unconventional entrepreneur who introduced us to the concept of crush it—knows how to get things done, have fun, and be massively successful. A marketing and business genius, Gary had the foresight to go beyond traditional methods and use social media tools such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube to reach an untapped audience that continues to grow.#AskGaryVee showcases the most useful and interesting questions Gary has addressed on his popular show. Distilling and expanding on the podcast’s most urgent and evergreen themes, Gary presents practical, timely, and timeless advice on marketing, social media, entrepreneurship, and everything else you’ve been afraid to ask but are dying to know. Gary gives you the insights and information you need on everything from effectively using Twitter to launching a small business, hiring superstars to creating a personal brand, launching products effectively to staying healthy—and even buying wine.Whether you’re planning to start your own company, working in digital media, or have landed your first job in a traditional company, #AskGaryVee is your essential guide to making things happen in a big way.
The book is rated 4.26/5 at goodreads.com, from 1671 ratings. See 199 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/228nErs.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2xMYYfL.

A technology book recommendation: The Idealist: Aaron Swartz and the Rise of Free Culture on the Internet by Justin Peters

A critic review (source NY Times) can be read at: http://nyti.ms/2cPVAcV.
…in the final pages, as Peters dons the sports coat of the history lecturer and draws a lame comparison between Aaron Swartz and Noah Webster, he disappoints once again. It’s the whole book in microcosm: superb when it focuses on its subject, unnecessary when it veers away.
Book description from Google Books:
A smart, lively history of the Internet free culture movement and its larger effects on society—and the life and shocking suicide of Aaron Swartz, a founding developer of Reddit and Creative Commons—from Slate correspondent Justin Peters.Aaron Swartz was a zealous young advocate for the free exchange of information and creative content online. He committed suicide in 2013 after being indicted by the government for illegally downloading millions of academic articles from a nonprofit online database. From the age of fifteen, when Swartz, a computer prodigy, worked with Lawrence Lessig to launch Creative Commons, to his years as a fighter for copyright reform and open information, to his work leading the protests against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), to his posthumous status as a cultural icon, Swartz’s life was inextricably connected to the free culture movement. Now Justin Peters examines Swartz’s life in the context of 200 years of struggle over the control of information. In vivid, accessible prose, The Idealist situates Swartz in the context of other “data moralists” past and present, from lexicographer Noah Webster to ebook pioneer Michael Hart to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. In the process, the book explores the history of copyright statutes and the public domain; examines archivists’ ongoing quest to build the “library of the future”; and charts the rise of open access, copyleft, and other ideologies that have come to challenge protectionist IP policies. Peters also breaks down the government’s case against Swartz and explains how we reached the point where federally funded academic research came to be considered private property, and downloading that material in bulk came to be considered a federal crime. The Idealist is an important investigation of the fate of the digital commons in an increasingly corporatized Internet, and an essential look at the impact of the free culture movement on our daily lives and on generations to come.
The book is rated 3.82/5 at goodreads.com, from 255 ratings. See 39 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1QzI5d0.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tVz2AL.
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