A teenage book recommendation: The DUFF: (Designated Ugly Fat Friend) by Kody Keplinger

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1O9wfpH.
Overall, The DUFF is something I would recommend. 4/5. And I happily hold my hands up and applaud young author Kody Keplinger for such an outstanding achievement.
Book description from Google Books:
Seventeen-year-old Bianca Piper is cynical and loyal, and she doesn’t think she’s the prettiest of her friends by a long shot. She’s also way too smart to fall for the charms of man-slut and slimy school hottie Wesley Rush. In fact, Bianca hates him. And when he nicknames her “Duffy,” she throws her Coke in his face. But things aren’t so great at home right now. Desperate for a distraction, Bianca ends up kissing Wesley. And likes it. Eager for escape, she throws herself into a closeted enemies-with-benefits relationship with Wesley. Until it all goes horribly awry. It turns out that Wesley isn’t such a bad listener, and his life is pretty screwed up, too. Suddenly Bianca realizes with absolute horror that she’s falling for the guy she thought she hated more than anyone.
The book is rated 3.86/5 at goodreads.com, from 145179 ratings. See 11088 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1O9wh0Y.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2syDGkk.

A teenage book recommendation: Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1QM7XEp.
This book is beautifully crafted and written with understanding for those people who have disabilities. The description and the story are well thought out and there are parts that make you cry and parts that make you laugh.
Book description from Google Books:
From award-winning author Sharon Draper comes Out of My Mind, the story of a brilliant girl who cannot speak or write. “If there is one book teens and parents (and everyone else) should read this year, Out of My Mind should be it” (Denver Post).Melody is not like most people. She cannot walk or talk, but she has a photographic memory; she can remember every detail of everything she has ever experienced. She is smarter than most of the adults who try to diagnose her and smarter than her classmates in her integrated classroom—the very same classmates who dismiss her as mentally challenged, because she cannot tell them otherwise. But Melody refuses to be defined by cerebral palsy. And she’s determined to let everyone know it…somehow. In this breakthrough story—reminiscent of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly—from multiple Coretta Scott King Award-winner Sharon Draper, readers will come to know a brilliant mind and a brave spirit who will change forever how they look at anyone with a disability.
The book is rated 4.37/5 at goodreads.com, from 68679 ratings. See 9960 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1QM7XUO.
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Google Books preview available in full post.

A teenage book recommendation: Gallagher Girls: 01: I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You by Ally Carter

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dfLGUj.
I thought this book was really entertaining and I was hooked from the first page. Cammie is a likeable character and the situations that she gets into with her friends are exciting to read.
Book description from Google Books:
Gallagher Academy might claim to be a school for geniuses – but it’s really a school for spies. Cammie Morgan is fluent in fourteen languages and capable of killing a man in seven different ways (three of which involve a piece of uncooked spaghetti). But the one thing the Gallagher Academy hasn’t prepared her for is what to do when she falls for an ordinary boy who thinks she’s an ordinary girl. Sure, she can tap his phone, hack into his computer, and track him through a mall without his ever being the wiser, but can Cammie have a normal relationship with a boy who can never know the truth about her?
The book is rated 3.82/5 at goodreads.com, from 157186 ratings. See 6703 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1LtKWmX.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: .
Google Books preview available in full post.

A teenage book recommendation: Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1QM7XEp.
This book is beautifully crafted and written with understanding for those people who have disabilities. The description and the story are well thought out and there are parts that make you cry and parts that make you laugh.
Book description from Google Books:
From award-winning author Sharon Draper comes Out of My Mind, the story of a brilliant girl who cannot speak or write. “If there is one book teens and parents (and everyone else) should read this year, Out of My Mind should be it” (Denver Post).Melody is not like most people. She cannot walk or talk, but she has a photographic memory; she can remember every detail of everything she has ever experienced. She is smarter than most of the adults who try to diagnose her and smarter than her classmates in her integrated classroom—the very same classmates who dismiss her as mentally challenged, because she cannot tell them otherwise. But Melody refuses to be defined by cerebral palsy. And she’s determined to let everyone know it…somehow. In this breakthrough story—reminiscent of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly—from multiple Coretta Scott King Award-winner Sharon Draper, readers will come to know a brilliant mind and a brave spirit who will change forever how they look at anyone with a disability.
The book is rated 4.37/5 at goodreads.com, from 68647 ratings. See 9956 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1QM7XUO.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tharm8.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A teenage book recommendation: Gallagher Girls: 01: I’d Tell You I Love You, But Then I’d Have To Kill You by Ally Carter

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dfLGUj.
I thought this book was really entertaining and I was hooked from the first page. Cammie is a likeable character and the situations that she gets into with her friends are exciting to read.
Book description from Google Books:
Gallagher Academy might claim to be a school for geniuses – but it’s really a school for spies. Cammie Morgan is fluent in fourteen languages and capable of killing a man in seven different ways (three of which involve a piece of uncooked spaghetti). But the one thing the Gallagher Academy hasn’t prepared her for is what to do when she falls for an ordinary boy who thinks she’s an ordinary girl. Sure, she can tap his phone, hack into his computer, and track him through a mall without his ever being the wiser, but can Cammie have a normal relationship with a boy who can never know the truth about her?
The book is rated 3.82/5 at goodreads.com, from 157177 ratings. See 6702 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1LtKWmX.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: .
Google Books preview available in full post.

A teenage book recommendation: American Grotesque: The Life and Art of William Mortensen by William Mortensen

A critic review (source LA Times) can be read at: http://lat.ms/1sdZXC1.
…much of Mortensen’s work retains its power to haunt, if not shock, viewers whose sensibilities have been numbed by a 24/7 news cycle reliant on disturbing imagery.
Book description from Google Books:
American Grotesque is a lavish retrospective of grotesque, occult, and erotic images by the forgotten Hollywood photographer William Mortensen (1897–1965), an innovative pictorialist visionary whom Ansel Adams called the “Antichrist” and to whom Anton LaVey dedicated The Satanic Bible.Mortensen’s countless technical innovations and inspired use of special effects prefigures the development of digital manipulation and Photoshop. Includes a gallery of more than one hundred striking photographs in duotone and color, many of them previously unseen, and accompanying essays by Mortensen and others on his life, work, techniques, and influence.
The book is rated 4.41/5 at goodreads.com, from 71 ratings. See 12 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1A0mQ9H.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tZowIA.

A teenage book recommendation: Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones

A critic review (source Blog Critics) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2d50MH1.
While the middle section of the novel is likely longer than it needs to be, Wynne Jones’ breezy style and clever diction push the reader through the less eventful sections. Despite the meandering nature of the plot, events tie together very nicely by the time the final page has been turned.
Book description from Google Books:
In the land of Ingary, such things as spells, invisible cloaks, and seven-league boots were everyday things. The Witch of the Waste was another matter.After fifty years of quiet, it was rumored that the Witch was about to terrorize the country again. So when a moving black castle, blowing dark smoke from its four thin turrets, appeared on the horizon, everyone thought it was the Witch. The castle, however, belonged to Wizard Howl, who, it was said, liked to suck the souls of young girls.The Hatter sisters–Sophie, Lettie, and Martha–and all the other girls were warned not to venture into the streets alone. But that was only the beginning.In this giant jigsaw puzzle of a fantasy, people and things are never quite what they seem. Destinies are intertwined, identities exchanged, lovers confused. The Witch has placed a spell on Howl. Does the clue to breaking it lie in a famous poem? And what will happen to Sophie Hatter when she enters Howl’s castle?Diana Wynne Jones’s entrancing fantasy is filled with surprises at every turn, but when the final stormy duel between the Witch and the Wizard is finished, all the pieces fall magically into place.
The book is rated 4.30/5 at goodreads.com, from 139082 ratings. See 9085 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1J9nOJl.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tcz0km.

A teenage book recommendation: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1J6u3xw.
This book, in my eyes, was utter perfection. Told from the perspective of Ari, a quiet boy who has shrunk inside himself as he’s grown up around a brother in prison who he knows nothing about, a mother in denial and a father haunted by the war. That’s until Dante comes along.
Book description from Google Books:
A lyrical novel about family and friendship from critically acclaimed author Benjamin Alire Sáenz.Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be.
The book is rated 4.34/5 at goodreads.com, from 119252 ratings. See 18670 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1J6u2cO.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2sq59o7.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A teenage book recommendation: The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman

A critic review (source Dear Author) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2dvwRb7.
I liked that she was so devoted to her work; I have always found it an admirable trait. I thought that she was competent but not arrogant. She made mistakes, but she always fought hard and gave it her best try. I have not met a character like her for quite some time.
Book description from Google Books:
The first in a gripping, adventurous series, The Invisible Library is the astounding debut from Genevieve Cogman.Irene must be at the top of her game or she’ll be off the case – permanently. . .Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, which harvests fiction from different realities. And along with her enigmatic assistant Kai, she’s posted to an alternative London. Their mission – to retrieve a dangerous book. But when they arrive, it’s already been stolen. London’s underground factions seem prepared to fight to the very death to find her book.Adding to the jeopardy, this world is chaos-infested – the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic. Irene’s new assistant is also hiding secrets of his own.Soon, she’s up to her eyebrows in a heady mix of danger, clues and secret societies. Yet failure is not an option – the nature of reality itself is at stake.The Invisible Library is followed by the second title in The Invisible Library series, The Masked City.
The book is rated 3.73/5 at goodreads.com, from 15896 ratings. See 2704 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2dvvlFN.
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Google Books preview available in full post.

A teenage book recommendation: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Book 2) by J.K. Rowling

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/1HknkgZ.
In the second of the series, strange things are happening at Hogwarts. Lots of people are getting petrified by a weird creature travelling through the pipes…This was another great novel, definitely more spooky than the last. Spooky and adventurous.
Book description from Google Books:
In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the summer after Harry’s first year at Hogwarts has been his worst summer ever… the Dursleys more distant and horrible than ever before. But just as he’s packing his bags to return to school, a creature named Dobby the house-elf announces that if Harry goes back to Hogwarts, disaster will strike. And it turns out, Dobby is right. Harry and Ron miss the Hogwarts Express, so they fly to school in a blue Ford Anglia, crash landing in the notorious Whomping Willow. Soon other worries accumulate: the outrageously stuck-up new professor Gilderoy Lockhart; a ghost named Moaning Myrtle, who haunts the girls’ bathroom; the strange behavior of Ron’s little sister, Ginny Weasley; rumors about the "Chamber of Secrets," a cavern buried deep below Hogwarts; and a magical diary owned by Tom Riddle, a Hogwarts student of long ago. Harry is also shocked to discover that he can speak Parseltongue, the language of snakes – a rare ability that Lord Voldemort also possessed – and that anti-Muggle prejudice exists in the Wizarding world, even affecting Harry’s friend Hermione. But all of these seem like minor concerns when someone starts turning Hogwarts students to stone: an evildoer said to be the fearsome Heir of Salazar Slytherin, on of the founders of the school. Could it be Draco Malfoy, Harry’s most poisonous rival? Could it be Hagrid whose mysterious past is finally told? Or could it be the one person everyone at Hogwarts most suspects: Harry Potter himself?
The book is rated 4.37/5 at goodreads.com, from 1881842 ratings. See 33533 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/1e7FpoX.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2tCg8P2.