A thriller book recommendation: A Promise to Kill: A Clyde Barr Novel by Erik Storey

A critic review (source Washington Times) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CJEJno.
Last year his “Nothing Short of Dying” was widely hailed as the best debut novel in the mystery/crime/thriller genre and his second book released this week equals — some of us will say surpasses — his impressive first.
Book description from Google Books:
From the author dubbed by Jeffery Deaver “a born storyteller” whose first novel Nothing Short of Dying was hailed as “exceptional,” “a rollercoaster read,” and “adrenaline-fueled” by publications on both sides of the Atlantic, this is Erik Storey’s next entry in the Clyde Barr series, a locomotive-paced brawler that has its hero teaming with besieged members of a Native American reservation to thwart outlaw bikers who are putting hundreds of thousands of lives at risk.Clyde Barr, the drifter with lethal skills, is alone again, wandering the highways of the American West in search of something to believe in. As summer turns to autumn, he trades his car for a horse and heads for the mountains, planning to clear his head and regain his edge with some hunting. But when he runs across an elderly sick man—a Ute Indian from a nearby reservation—Clyde’s dream of solitude is quickly dashed. On the reservation, Clyde finds the old man’s daughter, Lawana, and grandson, Taylor, as well as a group of menacing bikers called Reapers running wild in the economically depressed, half-abandoned village. Gripped by the desire to do good in a hard world, Clyde offers to stay on Lawana’s ranch to help out until her father is released from the hospital. He controls himself around the bikers, even when he sees them harass a few Native American women—but when the Reapers attack a local boy Clyde has to do something. As tensions rise between the locals and the Reapers, Clyde’s efforts to protect the reservation become a fight for his, Lawana’s, and Taylor’s lives. And then the stakes ratchet up even more. In the remote Utah desert, surrounded by enemies, with no law enforcement presence, and with communication effectively cut off, Clyde must find a way to save his new friends, defeat the gang, and, hopefully, escape with his own skin intact. A Promise to Kill is an edge-of-the-seat thriller, pushing its no-hold-barred hero to new levels of improvisation and bare-knuckled blunt force.
The book is rated 3.71/5 at goodreads.com, from 151 ratings. See 32 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2Ce383d.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Cj9KNT.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A thriller book recommendation: The Summer That Melted Everything: A Novel by Tiffany McDaniel

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CJvm71.
A startlingly rich imagination shouts its glorious arrival in this overwhelming narrative of sin, redemption, love and death.
Book description from Google Books:
The devil comes to Ohio in Tiffany McDaniel’s breathtaking and heartbreaking literary debut novel, The Summer That Melted Everything.*Winner of The Guardian’s 2016 “Not the Booker” Prize and the Ohioana Readers’ Choice Award*Goodreads Choice Award nominee for “Best Fiction” and “Best Debut”“A wonderfully original, profoundly unsettling, deeply moving novel that delivers both the shock of fully realized reality and the deep resonance of parable…A remarkable debut.” —Robert Olen Butler, Pulitzer Prize winning author of A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain“A haunting Appalachian Gothic novel that calls into question the nature of good and evil.” —Akron Beacon JournalFielding Bliss has never forgotten the summer of 1984: the year a heat wave scorched Breathed, Ohio. The year he became friends with the devil.Sal seems to appear out of nowhere – a bruised and tattered thirteen-year-old boy claiming to be the devil himself answering an invitation. Fielding Bliss, the son of a local prosecutor, brings him home where he’s welcomed into the Bliss family, assuming he’s a runaway from a nearby farm town.When word spreads that the devil has come to Breathed, not everyone is happy to welcome this self-proclaimed fallen angel. Murmurs follow him and tensions rise, along with the temperature as an unbearable heat wave rolls into town right along with him. As strange accidents start to occur, riled by the feverish heat, some in the town start to believe that Sal is exactly who he claims to be. While the Bliss family wrestle with their own personal demons, a fanatic drives the town to the brink of a catastrophe that will change this sleepy Ohio backwater forever.
The book is rated 3.95/5 at goodreads.com, from 3642 ratings. See 961 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2CJvVh9.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Cd7SWU.

A thriller book recommendation: Sing, Unburied, Sing: A Novel by Jesmyn Ward

A critic review (source Star Tribune) can be read at: http://strib.mn/2DuV2EE.
“Sing, Unburied, Sing,” the story of a few days in the lives of a tumultuous Mississippi Gulf Coast family and the histories and ghosts that haunt it, is nothing short of magnificent.
Book description from Google Books:
*WINNER of the NATIONAL BOOK AWARD for FICTION *A TIME MAGAZINE BEST NOVEL OF THE YEAR and A NEW YORK TIMES TOP 10 OF 2017 *Finalist for the Kirkus Prize *Finalist for the Andrew Carnegie Medal *Publishers Weekly Top 10 of 2017 “The heart of Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing is story—the yearning for a narrative to help us understand ourselves, the pain of the gaps we’ll never fill, the truths that are failed by words and must be translated through ritual and song…Ward’s writing throbs with life, grief, and love, and this book is the kind that makes you ache to return to it.” —BuzzfeedIn Jesmyn Ward’s first novel since her National Book Award–winning Salvage the Bones, this singular American writer brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first-century America. An intimate portrait of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle, Sing, Unburied, Sing journeys through Mississippi’s past and present, examining the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power—and limitations—of family bonds. Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn’t lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won’t acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager. His mother, Leonie, is an inconsistent presence in his and his toddler sister’s lives. She is an imperfect mother in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is Black and her children’s father is White. She wants to be a better mother but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. Simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high, Leonie is embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances. When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary. At Parchman, there is another thirteen-year-old boy, the ghost of a dead inmate who carries all of the ugly history of the South with him in his wandering. He too has something to teach Jojo about fathers and sons, about legacies, about violence, about love. Rich with Ward’s distinctive, lyrical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing is a majestic new work and an unforgettable family story.
The book is rated 4.15/5 at goodreads.com, from 15536 ratings. See 2653 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D1JNmj.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2CYcTmG.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A thriller book recommendation: Made for Love by Alissa Nutting

A critic review (source NPR) can be read at: http://n.pr/2DqAugB.
Made for Love has a deviant instinct that make it initially captivating — but it doesn’t do the necessary other work of a good novel. For all the ostensible unexpectedness (again, dolphins), it rarely surprises.
Book description from Google Books:
From one of our most exciting and provocative young writers, a poignant, riotously funny story of how far some will go for love—and how far some will go to escape it. Hazel has just moved into a trailer park of senior citizens, with her father and Diane—his extremely lifelike sex doll—as her roommates. Life with Hazel’s father is strained at best, but her only alternative seems even bleaker. She’s just run out on her marriage to Byron Gogol, CEO and founder of Gogol Industries, a monolithic corporation hell-bent on making its products and technologies indispensable in daily life. For over a decade, Hazel put up with being veritably quarantined by Byron in the family compound, her every movement and vital sign tracked. But when he demands to wirelessly connect the two of them via brain chips in a first-ever human “mind-meld,” Hazel decides what was once merely irritating has become unbearable. The world she escapes into is a far cry from the dry and clinical bubble she’s been living in, a world populated with a whole host of deviant oddballs. As Hazel tries to carve out a new life for herself in this uncharted territory, Byron is using the most sophisticated tools at his disposal to find her and bring her home. His threats become more and more sinister, and Hazel is forced to take drastic measures in order to find a home of her own and free herself from Byron’s virtual clutches once and for all. Perceptive and compulsively readable, Made for Love is at once an absurd, raunchy comedy and a dazzling, profound meditation marriage, monogamy, and family.
The book is rated 3.53/5 at goodreads.com, from 1812 ratings. See 424 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D0BNSC.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2Dt7ogJ.
Google Books preview available in full post.

A thriller book recommendation: The Shape of Bones: A Novel by Daniel Galera

A critic review (source Star Tribune) can be read at: http://strib.mn/2CHBT1Z.
Beautifully translated by Alison Entrekin, Galera’s novel is a powerful evocation of one man’s rough, reckless childhood and his efforts to break free and give in to his desire “to take on and be taken on by the world.”
Book description from Google Books:
“A book of visceral and tender beauty whose echoes persist long after the final page.” –David Mitchell, author of The Bone Clocks A coming of age tale of brutal beauty and disarming tenderness from one of Brazil’s most exciting young novelists, an author writing in the footsteps of “Roberto Bola�o, Jim Harrison, the Coen brothers and…Denis Johnson” (The New York Times) A young man wakes up at dawn to drive to the Andes, to climb the Cerro Bonete–a mountain untouched by ice axes and climbers, one of the planet’s final mountains to be conquered–as an act of heroic bravado, or foolishness. But instead, he finds himself dragged, by the undertow of memory, to Esplanada, the neighborhood he grew up in, to the brotherhood of his old friends, and to the clearing in the woods where he witnessed an act that has run like a scar through the rest of his life. Back in Esplanada, the young man revisits his initiation into adulthood and recalls his boyhood friends who formed a strange and volatile pack. Together they play video games, get drunk around bonfires, pick fights, and goad each other into bike races where the winner is the boy who has the most spectacular crash. Caught between the threat of not being man enough, the desire to please his friends, and the intoxicating contact-high of danger, the boy finds himself following the rules of the pack even as the risks mount. And in a moment that reverberates and repeats itself in new ways in his adulthood, his fantasies of who he is and what it means to be a man come crashing down, and life asserts itself as an endless rehearsal for a heroic moment that may never arrive. From one of Brazil’s most dazzling writers, The Shape of Bones is an exhilarating story of mythic power. Daniel Galera has written a pulse-racing novel with the otherworldly wisdom of a parable.
The book is rated 3.78/5 at goodreads.com, from 454 ratings. See 49 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2CfTLjB.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2CfU267.

A thriller book recommendation: Smile: A Novel by Roddy Doyle

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2D8gHlh.
Like all good literature, it will inspire debate but also admiration for the courage of a hugely successful writer who refuses to be predictable and uses the novel to challenge both the reader’s sense of ease and the nature of the form itself.
Book description from Google Books:
From the author of the Booker Prize winning Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, a bold, haunting novel about the uncertainty of memory and how we contend with the past. “It’s his bravest novel yet; it’s also, by far, his best.” — npr.org “The closest thing he’s written to a psychological thriller.”- The New York Times Book Review Just moved into a new apartment, alone for the first time in years, Victor Forde goes every evening to Donnelly’s for a pint, a slow one. One evening his drink is interrupted. A man in shorts and a pink shirt comes over and sits down. He seems to know Victor’s name and to remember him from secondary school. His name is Fitzpatrick. Victor dislikes him on sight, dislikes, too, the memories that Fitzpatrick stirs up of five years being taught by the Christian Brothers. He prompts other memories–of Rachel, his beautiful wife who became a celebrity, and of Victor’s own small claim to fame, as the man who would say the unsayable on the radio. But it’s the memories of school, and of one particular brother, that Victor cannot control and which eventually threaten to destroy his sanity. Smile has all the features for which Roddy Doyle has become famous: the razor-sharp dialogue, the humor, the superb evocation of adolescence, but this is a novel unlike any he has written before. When you finish the last page you will have been challenged to reevaluate everything you think you remember so clearly.
The book is rated 3.50/5 at goodreads.com, from 1118 ratings. See 225 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2D8gRsT.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D6GCtA.

A thriller book recommendation: The Red-Haired Woman: A novel by Orhan Pamuk

A critic review (source NY Journal of Books) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CZlMMH.
Happily, The Red-Haired Woman is more approachable than some of Pamuk’s oeuvre…But some things never get obsolete, including good writing by masters like Pamuk.
Book description from Google Books:
From the Nobel Prize winner and best-selling author of Snow and My Name Is Red, a fable of fathers and sons and the desires that come between them. On the outskirts of a town thirty miles from Istanbul, a master well digger and his young apprentice are hired to find water on a barren plain. As they struggle in the summer heat, excavating without luck meter by meter, the two will develop a filial bond neither has known before–not the poor middle-aged bachelor nor the middle-class boy whose father disappeared after being arrested for politically subversive activities. The pair will come to depend on each other and exchange stories reflecting disparate views of the world. But in the nearby town, where they buy provisions and take their evening break, the boy will find an irresistible diversion. The Red-Haired Woman, an alluring member of a travelling theatre company, catches his eye and seems as fascinated by him as he is by her. The young man’s wildest dream will be realized, but, when in his distraction a horrible accident befalls the well digger, the boy will flee, returning to Istanbul. Only years later will he discover whether he was in fact responsible for his master’s death and who the redheaded enchantress was. A beguiling mystery tale of family and romance, of east and west, tradition and modernity, by one of the great storytellers of our time. Translated from the Turkish by Ekin Oklap.
The book is rated 3.66/5 at goodreads.com, from 4400 ratings. See 496 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2CWShex.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2DssI5O.

A thriller book recommendation: The Golden House: A Novel by Salman Rushdie

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2Dqe3IG.
Rushdie has always been an impish myth-manipulator, refusing to accept, as in this novel, that the lives of the emperors can’t be blended with film noir, popular culture and crime caper. On the evidence of The Golden House, he is quite right.
Book description from Google Books:
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER * A modern American epic set against the panorama of contemporary politics and culture–a hurtling, page-turning mystery that is equal parts The Great Gatsby and The Bonfire of the Vanities On the day of Barack Obama’s inauguration, an enigmatic billionaire from foreign shores takes up residence in the architectural jewel of “the Gardens,” a cloistered community in New York’s Greenwich Village. The neighborhood is a bubble within a bubble, and the residents are immediately intrigued by the eccentric newcomer and his family. Along with his improbable name, untraceable accent, and unmistakable whiff of danger, Nero Golden has brought along his three adult sons: agoraphobic, alcoholic Petya, a brilliant recluse with a tortured mind; Apu, the flamboyant artist, sexually and spiritually omnivorous, famous on twenty blocks; and D, at twenty-two the baby of the family, harboring an explosive secret even from himself. There is no mother, no wife; at least not until Vasilisa, a sleek Russian expat, snags the septuagenarian Nero, becoming the queen to his king–a queen in want of an heir. Our guide to the Goldens’ world is their neighbor Ren�, an ambitious young filmmaker. Researching a movie about the Goldens, he ingratiates himself into their household. Seduced by their mystique, he is inevitably implicated in their quarrels, their infidelities, and, indeed, their crimes. Meanwhile, like a bad joke, a certain comic-book villain embarks upon a crass presidential run that turns New York upside-down. Set against the strange and exuberant backdrop of current American culture and politics, The Golden House also marks Salman Rushdie’s triumphant and exciting return to realism. The result is a modern epic of love and terrorism, loss and reinvention–a powerful, timely story told with the daring and panache that make Salman Rushdie a force of light in our dark new age. Praise for The Golden House “If you read a lot of fiction, you know that every once in a while you stumble upon a book that transports you, telling a story full of wonder and leaving you marveling at how it ever came out of the author’s head. The Golden House is one of those books. . . . [It] tackles more than a handful of universal truths while feeling wholly original.”–The Associated Press “The Golden House . . . ranks among Rushdie’s most ambitious and provocative books [and] displays the quicksilver wit and playful storytelling of Rushdie’s best work.”–USA Today “[The Golden House] is a recognizably Rushdie novel in its playfulness, its verbal jousting, its audacious bravado, its unapologetic erudition, and its sheer, dazzling brilliance.”–The Boston Globe
The book is rated 3.68/5 at goodreads.com, from 2402 ratings. See 594 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2DrZp3H.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2CUVk6M.

A thriller book recommendation: We All Love the Beautiful Girls by Joanne Proulx

A critic review (source Toronto Star) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CZjAFI.
While this sounds like it might be the set-up for a standard triumph-against-adversity narrative, a fall-and-rise story, Proulx has something considerably stronger, and subtler, in store.
Book description from Google Books:
Who do the lucky become when their luck sours? One frigid winter night, the happily prosperous Mia and Michael Slate discover that a close friend and business partner has cheated them out of their life savings. On the same night, their son, Finn, passes out in the snow at a party — a mistake with shattering consequences. Everyone finds their own ways of coping with the ensuing losses. For Finn, it’s Jess, a former babysitter who sneaks into his bed at night, even as she refuses to leave her boyfriend. Mia and Michael find themselves forgoing tenderness for rougher sex and seeking solace outside their marriage: Mia in a flirtation with a former colleague, whose empty condo becomes a blank canvas for a new life, and Michael at an abandoned baseball diamond, with a rusty pitching machine and a street kid eager to catch balls in Finn’s old glove. As they creep closer to the edge — of betrayal, infidelity, and revenge — the story moves into more savage terrain. With honesty, compassion, and a tough emotional precision, award-winning author Joanne Proulx explores the itch of the flesh, sexual aggression, the reach of love and anger, and the question of who ultimately suffers when the privileged stumble.
The book is rated 3.66/5 at goodreads.com, from 117 ratings. See 33 reader reviews at: http://bit.ly/2Cyui4Y.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2D0L7Xm.

A thriller book recommendation: Safe: A Novel by Ryan Gattis

A critic review (source Guardian) can be read at: http://bit.ly/2CNkFQX.
Through multiple definitions of the word “safe” – physical, emotional, psychological, financial – Gattis has created a gripping novel about opportunity, transformation and hope.
Book description from Google Books:
“Safe is a propulsive thriller that confirms Ryan Gattis as one of our most gifted novelists.” —Michael Connelly, author of The Wrong Side of GoodbyeRyan Gattis’ gritty, fast-paced thriller, Safe, hurtles readers toward a shocking conclusion that asks the toughest question of all: how far would you go to protect the ones you love?Ricky ‘Ghost’ Mendoza, Jr. is trying to be good. In recovery and working as a freelance safecracker for the DEA, the FBI, and any other government agency willing to pay him, Ghost is determined to live clean for the rest of his days. And maybe he could, if the most important person in his life hadn’t gotten into serious financial trouble. To fix it, all Ghost has to do is crack a safe and steal drug money from under the noses of the gangs and the Feds without getting caught. Or killed.Rudy ‘Glasses’ Reyes runs drugs and cleans up messes for the baddest of bad men. When Ghost hits one of his safes, Glasses must hunt him down or be held accountable. But Glasses is worried about more than just money. The heist puts everything in his life at risk—his livelihood, his freedom, even his family.
The book is rated 4.00/5 at goodreads.com, from 2 ratings.
Buy it or see reader reviews on amazon.com at: http://amzn.to/2CocM3a.